Richard Rockefeller

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ROCKEFELLER--Dr. Richard. The David Rockefeller Family deeply mourns the sudden death of Dr. Richard Gilder Rockefeller on June 13, 2014.

He was a cherished husband, father, son, brother, uncle, and grandfather who played a pivotal role in our extended family.

We have been profoundly touched by the outpouring of love, admiration and support from people all over the world whose lives Richard also touched. Richard was passionate about everything he did as a physician, as an activist and as a philanthropist. He was at home in art, in music and in nature. He was intensely curious about how things work, from the physical world to the human psyche.

His formal education came from the North Country School, the Choate School, Harvard College and the Harvard Medical School. But his informal learning never stopped, nor did his drive to make the world a better place.

He founded, led or served many non-profit organizations (including those listed below) and gave generously to them in time and treasure. In addition, he served as president of the Rockefeller Family Fund and chairman of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund.

Richard's immediate family consists of his wife Nancy King Rockefeller; his son Clayton and daughter Rebecca; his grandchildren Ozzy and Elsa and Wilder; Nancy's sons Max and Griffin; his father David Rockefeller; Richards' siblings and spouses, David and Susan, Abby and Lee, Neva and Bruce, Peggy and Barry, Eileen and Paul; and numerous nieces and nephews and cousins whom he adored.

 

 ROCKEFELLER--Dr. Richard. The David Rockefeller Family deeply mourns the sudden death of Dr. Richard Gilder Rockefeller on June 13, 2014. He was a cherished husband, father, son, brother, uncle, and grandfather who played a pivotal role in our extended family. We have been profoundly touched by the outpouring of love, admiration and support from people all over the world whose lives Richard also touched. Richard was passionate about everything he did as a physician, as an activist and as a philanthropist. He was at home in art, in music and in nature. He was intensely curious about how things work, from the physical world to the human psyche. His formal education came from the North Country School, the Choate School, Harvard College and the Harvard Medical School. But his informal learning never stopped, nor did his drive to make the world a better place. He founded, led or served many non-profit organizations (including those listed below) and gave generously to them in time and treasure. In addition, he served as president of the Rockefeller Family Fund and chairman of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. Richard's immediate family consists of his wife Nancy King Rockefeller; his son Clayton and daughter Rebecca; his grandchildren Ozzy and Elsa and Wilder; Nancy's sons Max and Griffin; his father David Rockefeller; Richards' siblings and spouses, David and Susan, Abby and Lee, Neva and Bruce, Peggy and Barry, Eileen and Paul; and numerous nieces and nephews and cousins whom he adored. We all miss him so much. The Family plans a private service of remembrance this summer, and there will be a memorial service in the fall, time and place to be announced. Contributions in his memory may be made to: Sargasso Sea Alliance (http://www.sargassoalliance.org/) ; Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (the PTSD project) (http://www.maps.org/) ; Doctors without Borders (http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/);  Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (http://www.dndina.org/) ; Maine Coast Heritage Trust (http://www.mcht.org/)  Published in The New York Times on June 27, 2014

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/nytimes/obituary.aspx?pid=171511223

Son of David Rockefeller Dies in Small-Plane Crash
By MARC SANTORAJUNE 13, 2014
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Richard Rockefeller in 1999. Credit Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press

Dr. Richard Rockefeller, son of the billionaire and prominent philanthropist David Rockefeller, was killed Friday morning when the small plane he was piloting crashed shortly after takeoff, according to a spokesman for the family.

Dr. Rockefeller, 65, was the only person on board the plane, which the authorities identified as a Piper Meridian single-engine turboprop.

The cause of the crash was not immediately clear.

Dr. Rockefeller took off from Westchester County Airport at 8:08 a.m., departing from Runway 16 into dense fog and steady rain. Less than 10 minutes later, the Federal Aviation Administration notified airport officials that it could not reach the pilot.

At 8:23 a.m., the local police reported that the plane had crashed less than a mile from the airport, near Cottage Avenue in the town of Harrison.


It smashed through several trees and narrowly missed an occupied house before hitting the ground and breaking into pieces, the authorities said.

Dr. Rockefeller was flying home after visiting his father, David, at the family’s estate in Pocantico Hills, a hamlet in the town of Mount Pleasant. Mr. Rockefeller’s 99th birthday was Thursday.

David Rockefeller is the oldest living member of the family whose name adorns countless university buildings, hospital wings, libraries and museums across the country.

He is a grandson of John D. Rockefeller, an accounting clerk who invested $4,000 into an oil refinery business and went on to lead the Standard Oil Company. He became one of the richest and most famous men in the world.

Fraser P. Seitel, the family spokesman, said Dr. Rockefeller was an experienced pilot and had flown in and out of the Westchester airport many times.

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were sent to investigate the crash.

“The family is in shock,” Mr. Seitel said. “This is a terrible tragedy. Richard was a wonderful and cherished son, brother, husband, father and grandfather.”

Dr. Rockefeller was a family physician in Falmouth, Me., who earlier practiced and taught medicine in Portland, Me. He was married with two children and two stepchildren.

He was chairman of the United States Advisory Board of Doctors Without Borders from 1989 until 2010, and served on the board of Rockefeller University until 2006.

Doctors Without Borders issued a statement on his death. Dr. Deane Marchbein, president of the United States division of Doctors Without Borders, said the group was “devastated.”

“Richard gave so much of his life to support Doctors Without Borders,” Dr. Marchbein said in the statement. “He made so many vital contributions that have helped Doctors Without Borders provide independent medical humanitarian assistance to millions of patients in over 70 countries.”

In recent years, Dr. Rockefeller was working to help establish better treatment for those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, Mr. Seitel said.

He was also a past president of the Rockefeller Family Fund.

Correction: June 13, 2014
An earlier version of this article misstated the age of Richard Rockefeller, based on incorrect information from a family spokesman. He was 65, not 64.
A version of this article appears in print on June 14, 2014, on Page A21 of the New York edition with the headline: Son of David Rockefeller Dies in Crash of Small Plane. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/14/nyregion/richard-rockefeller-killed-in-new-york-plane-crash.html



The American Chronicle

Exposing evil, dispelling delusion, trumpeting truth, The American Chronicle covers historical and current topics relevant to the American experience and republic.
Saturday, February 21, 2015
The Strange Death of Richard Rockefeller
When philanthropist Richard Rockefeller died in a plane crash on June 13, 2014, the Jew owned press painted the event as a tragic loss of a good soul who served humanity. The truth is that Rockefeller was murdered like his Uncle Nelson.

Richard Rockefeller made his name as a doctor who taught and practiced medicine for allegedly altruistic reasons, especially as head of Doctors Without Borders. What these press reports failed to disclose is that Rockefeller was also a scientist - of the mad sort - who sought to treat Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome in soldiers returning from the imperial wars of aggression of the United States and Israel in the Middle East.

Rockefeller's preferred method of treatment was the saturation of sufferers with large quantities of drugs such MDMA, also known as the psychoactive drug Ecstasy. Besides numbing pain, did these drugs also serve as an MK-ULTRA aid? The main problem with this philosophy of treatment is that it fails to recognize the diagnostic value of pain - a phenomenon not to be numbed, but treated by disassembling the fears and traumas accumulated in a terroristic war waged by the world's 2 largest terrorist organizations.

Other commentators, such as Dr Joseph Farrell, introduced some interesting evidence regarding the death scene of Rockefeller outside Westchester, New York. The Piper PA 46 airplane he piloted carried a 122 gallon gas tank which was most likely full at takeoff. Short minutes after the flight started, the pilot lost contact with the Westchester control tower, and was next found crashed in a neighborhood near the New York City suburb. Interestingly enough there were no fires at the crash scene, leaving open the distinct likelihood that fuel had been cut off and other systems sabotaged to induce a fatal landing. Like John Kennedy, Jr, Richard Rockefeller was a very experienced pilot who had flown in and out of Westchester innumerable times.

Rockefeller had been a trustee of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, which Farrell uses to link him to financial interests where covert war is hot and heavy. For example, he mentioned that James S McDonald, CEO of Rockefeller and Company, "committed suicide" 5 days following the death of Rockfeller.

This story is utterly preposterous. McDonald was a very successful and powerful bankster who managed the finances of the Rockefeller fortune and offered sophisticated banking services for other wealthy high powered clients. We seriously doubt that he labored under any mental condition which would lead to suicide.

The truth is that a rash of bankster murders have occurred over the past 2 years, with McDonald and Rockefeller being 2 such examples. Taken together, the only reasonable conclusion is that they were murdered to send a message to the murderous David Rockefeller that his gig as terrorist and thief in chief were over.

Given the superb and tight security of the Rockefeller Empire, only a very sophisticated enemy of the Rockfellers could undertake the sabotage required to kill of one of the family's scions. We would also note that the news stories that David Rockefeller is worth 2.8 billion USD is a laughable lie. The wealth of that family has been buried in trusts and accounts so deep that an underground sonar couldn't find them. But the telltale evidence of the wealth is nonetheless palpable, and it reaches into the trillions.

Farrell notes that Rockefeller was murdered on Friday the 13th, a superstitious day which gained its notoriety as the day when Philip IV of France took on the Knights Templar in 1307 as part of his war against criminal international banksters. The irony is quite evident. Then again, perhaps it is more than irony.

Reference
Dr Joseph Farrell, The Nefarium, June 19, 2014

Anya, Death of Bankers, Richard Rockefeller, May Be Sign of Economic War as Well as Message to Nazi Scientists, Anya Is a Channel, June 20, 2014, accessed 2/20/2015

Copyright 2015 Tony Bonn. All rights reserved.
Posted by Tony Bonn at 12:58 AM
Labels: Death of Richard Rockefeller, Richard Rockefeller
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Home › Pilot Stories › After The Accident › The Richard Rockefeller Accident
Plane & Pilot
Published November 9, 2015
The Richard Rockefeller Accident
The NTSB completes its investigation of another high-profile GA accident
By Peter Katz

Airplane accidents are never pleasant news, but when the accident involves a high-profile individual such as the son of an assassinated U.S. president, movie star or a congressional figure, public interest in obtaining all of the details seems to run higher than had the accident involved someone like me or other comparatively non-public pilots. So it was with the accident in June of last year in which Dr. Richard Rockefeller, the 65-year-old son of billionaire banker and philanthropist David Rockefeller, was killed. Although the accident was noticed nationally, it grabbed headlines in the New York City metro area, where the Rockefellers have been prominent figures for many decades.

Richard Rockefeller was the great grandson of John D. Rockefeller, Sr., the founder of Standard Oil. He was a nephew of former Vice President Nelson Rockefeller, who also had served as governor of New York. The day before the accident, Richard had attended his father's 99th birthday celebration at the family estate in Pocantico Hills, N.Y. He had flown his Piper PA-46-500TP Meridian single-engine turboprop to Westchester County Airport (HPN), which is located near Pocantico Hills in the suburbs north of New York City.

Richard Rockefeller was president of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, chairman of the Doctors Without Borders' U.S. Advisory Board for more than 20 years and had been a board member of Rockefeller University. He was practicing medicine in Falmouth and Portland, Maine, and was married with two children and two stepchildren.

The NTSB's final report on the accident was released in July. The accident occurred shortly after 8 a.m., eastern daylight time on Friday, June 13, 2014. The airplane was destroyed when it struck trees and crashed shortly after takeoff from runway 16 at HPN. The weather conditions were about as low IFR as you'll find at Westchester, with visibility about 1/4-mile in fog and a 200-foot overcast ceiling. The wind was from the east at six knots. Rockefeller had filed an IFR flight plan for the trip to Portland International Jetport (PWM), Portland, Maine. The personal flight was conducted under Part 91.

Rockefeller had flown from PWM to HPN the previous day. Upon arrival at one of the FBOs that handle smaller general aviation aircraft, Rockefeller ordered fuel. The FBO put in 60 gallons, which filled the tanks. Rockefeller told FBO personnel to expect him back at 9:00 the next morning for his return flight to PWM.
At about 8:01, Rockefeller was given a slightly revised clearance that included a provision for him to expect clearance to 19,000 feet 10 minutes after departure.

The following morning, Rockefeller arrived at the FBO a little after 7:30, instead of 9:00. The customer service representative at the front desk of the FBO told investigators that Rockefeller said, "Good morning," and she told a line worker to bring his airplane from the hangar to the ramp. Rockefeller said, "I'd like to have the plane facing the wind, since it is strong this morning." Rockefeller then went to the restroom, returned and picked up his bag from a couch, and headed toward the door saying, "Thank you, goodbye, see you next time." The front desk representative responded, "...get rid of this terrible weather for us," which elicited a laugh from Rockefeller.

At about 7:50 a.m., Rockefeller radioed Clearance Delivery to obtain his IFR clearance. He was cleared to fly the Westchester Four standard departure, to expect clearance to 17,000 feet 10 minutes after departure and to fly direct to PWM. When the controller advised him to give them five minutes notice before starting his engine to allow time to get him in the departure sequence, Rockefeller replied, "...that five minutes should start now, so go ahead on the routing pool."

When there had been no word for about six minutes, Rockefeller radioed, "...just want to make sure you know I'm up on the ground and waiting clearance." At about 8:01, Rockefeller was given a slightly revised clearance that included a provision for him to expect clearance to 19,000 feet 10 minutes after departure. He then advised ground control he was ready to taxi.

At about 8:08, he had reached the departure end of runway 16 and advised the tower controller he was "...ready to go in sequence." About 20 seconds later, he was cleared for takeoff. Although the NTSB report places the time of the accident at about 8:08 am, it likely was a couple of minutes later if the times given in transcriptions of FAA radio communications are accurate.

FAA transcripts revealed that at about 8:11, the ground controller asked the tower controller if the Piper Meridian had gotten airborne. The tower controller replied, "I, uh, hope so." At about the same time, a controller at the New York TRACON LaGuardia Area position called the Westchester tower controller to ask if Rockefeller's plane had gotten airborne. The TRACON controller advised that he saw a target on radar for about a mile off the end of the runway, but it was now gone. The tower controller's responses to continued inquires as to whether the Piper was airborne included, "I have no idea. We have zero visibility."

Only five radar targets identified as being Rockefeller's airplane were captured, and all were over HPN airport property. The first three radar targets began about mid-point of the 6,500-foot-long runway, and each indicated an altitude of about 500 feet MSL. The airport elevation was 439 feet. The next and final two targets depicted a shallow right turn at 600 feet and 700 feet, respectively, before radar contact was lost. The final radar target was about one-half mile from the accident site.

The airplane came within about 20 feet of hitting a house, crashing in front of horse stables on residential property. Two witnesses at the stables told investigators that the weather was "dark, rainy, and foggy." They both reported first seeing the airplane when it appeared out of the clouds. They said the airplane hit trees in a level attitude, and was enveloped by a cloud of "blue smoke" with the odor of diesel fuel.

There was a strong odor of fuel at the wreckage site, and all major components of the airplane were accounted for. The initial impact point was in a tree approximately 60 feet high, and the airplane hit several other trees before hitting the ground.

Examination of the wreckage didn't reveal any mechanical malfunctions affecting the engine or airplane systems.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 2001. It used a Pratt & Whitney PT6A-42A, 850 hp turboprop engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed June 3, 2014, at a total aircraft time of 1,927.2 hours.

Rockefeller held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He had a current third-class Special Issuance medical certificate.

His most recent logbook showed 5,371.6 total flight hours. An entry showed he had completed an instrument proficiency check and flight review in the Piper Meridian a month before the accident.

Rockefeller's personal assistant told investigators that he had a 10 a.m. meeting in Portland on the morning of the accident. The meeting was with eight to 10 people involved in raising funds for a prominent public service organization in the state of Maine, in which he had been deeply involved. His assistant told investigators that he was "...unusually punctual, never late and would have been focused on arriving on time." The assistant said, "He would have checked radar weather reports and adjusted his departure time to accommodate a break in weather or forecast for worsening conditions."

According to Lockheed Martin Flight Service (LMFS), Rockefeller didn't obtain a weather briefing from either LMFS or from a Direct User Access Terminal Service (DUATS) vendor. The pilot filed an IFR flight plan through DUATS, but didn't include an alternate airport in the flight plan. An alternate would have been required under FAA regulations since the weather at PWM at the proposed time of arrival included an overcast ceiling at 300 feet with 1-1/2 miles visibility in light rain and fog.

The NTSB report made note of sensations that can be generated when taking off into IFR conditions. It cited the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook, which states, "Because of inertia, the sensory areas of the inner ear cannot detect slight changes in the attitude of the airplane, nor can they accurately sense attitude changes that occur at a uniform rate over a period of time. On the other hand, false sensations are often generated leading the pilot to believe the attitude of the airplane has changed when, in fact, it has not. These false sensations result in the pilot experiencing spatial disorientation."

The NTSB pointed to the FAA's publication Medical Facts for Pilots, which explained somatogravic illusions, which can occur when there's acceleration or deceleration. At takeoff into solid IFR, acceleration adds to the pilot's perception of the aircraft pitching up. It can lead him or her to push the control yoke forward to pitch the nose of the aircraft down.

The NTSB also cited an FAA Advisory Circular, "Aeronautical Decision Making." The FAA said, "Pilots, particularly those with considerable experience, as a rule always try to complete a flight as planned, please passengers, meet schedules, and generally demonstrate that they have 'the right stuff.'" The FAA's circular referred to "get-there-itis" which it said, "...clouds the vision and impairs judgment by causing a fixation on the original goal or destination combined with a total disregard for any alternative course of action."

The NTSB determined that the probable cause of this accident was the pilot's failure to maintain a positive climb rate after takeoff due to spatial disorientation (somatogravic illusion). Contributing to the accident was the pilot's self-induced pressure to depart and his decision to depart in low-ceiling and low-visibility conditions.

Peter Katz is editor and publisher of NTSB Reporter, an independent monthly update on aircraft accident investigations and other news concerning the National Transportation Safety Board. To subscribe, visit www.ntsbreporter.us or write to: NTSB Reporter, Subscription Dept., P.O. Box 831, White Plains, N.Y. 10602-0831.
3 thoughts on “The Richard Rockefeller Accident”

Lucius B. Gravely, IV says:
December 2, 2015 at 1:38 PM

Being an air traffic controller, I was totally dependent on instruments. My first flying lesson was going great and then the instructor asked me, “Aren’t you going to look out the window?” Heck, I didn’t need to–I just paid close attention to the instruments and the plane flew just fine
Antonio Falivene says:
December 15, 2015 at 5:35 PM

I want to make my congratulations with mr.Peter Katz for this excellent article. It gives a great insight in to IFR flying.

Thank you very much!!

Engineer
Antonio Falivene
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