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 "The best way to fight an enemy is head on- and out in the open."

Creator
Taylor, Moses, 1806-1882
Call number
MssCol 2955
Physical description
132 linear feet (326 boxes, 1166 v., 1 oversize folder)
Language
Materials in English
Preferred Citation
Moses Taylor papers, Manuscripts and Archives Division, The New York Public Library
Repository
Manuscripts and Archives Division
Access to materials
Advance notice required. Request access to this collection.
Moses Taylor (1806-1882) was a little-known but representative figure in the history of the mercantile and industrial development of the United States and Cuba in the nineteenth century. Taylor was a New York City merchant in the West Indies trade (chiefly Cuba), a long-time president of City Bank of New York, an entrepreneur and manager in the railroad and mining industries, a life-long Tammany supporter, an ambivalent War Democrat with personal and business ties to the South, and an important member of August Belmont's clique of Democratic businessmen. Bulk of the papers reflects Taylor's business career over five decades and is composed of correspondence and records, 1834-1889, of the trading house of Moses Taylor and the reorganized trading and investments firm of Moses Taylor & Company; personal papers, 1837-1880; papers of Taylor's estate, 1881-1900; papers, 1852-1882, relating to the estate of Taylor's father, Jacob Bloom Taylor; letters and papers, 1860s and 1870s, of Taylor's son, Henry A.C. Taylor, and other members of his family; correspondence and papers, 1830-1893, of Taylor's business partners, Percy Pyne (who was also his lieutenant and son-in-law) and Lawrence Turnure, and his closest associates in trade and industry, Henry Augustus Coit, Charles Heckscher and Philo Shelton; correspondence and records, 1830-1899, of the many industrial companies and public utilities in which Taylor and/or his family and estate had a financial interest; letters and papers, 1863-1888, relating to the Ten Years War of 1868-1878 in Cuba, during which Taylor's firm acted as agents for the independence movement; and records, 1793-1906, of other merchants.

BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL INFORMATION

Moses Taylor was a model nineteenth century New York merchant/capitalist, industrial organizer, War Democrat, and a president of the City Bank of New York from 1855 to 1881.

The Model New York Merchant: Moses Taylor is a little-known but representative figure in the history of nineteenth century American business. When he died on May 14, 1882, the New York Times reported his passing as "An Old Merchant's Death", and carried a lengthy account of his life under the headline, "Starting in Life With Nothing and Leaving Millions Behind Him - His Early Labors By the Midnight Oil - The History of a Self-Made Man". In May 1911 McClure's Magazine ran a series of articles on the "Masters of Capital in America". In the installment on City Bank, Taylor is described as "the last and possibly the greatest of the great New York Merchants".

Taylor's first business was the commercial house of Moses Taylor. Opened in New York City in 1832, the new commercial house focused on trade with the American South and the West Indies. The second business was the firm of Moses Taylor and Company reorganized in 1849 to manage his growing industrial and financial ventures as well as trade. The business records, which comprise roughly nine-tenths of the collection, document the activities of Taylor, his partners, and his close associates in trade and industry, among them Tomas Terry and the Drake family of Cuba, Marshall O. Roberts, August Belmont, William E. Dodge, Cyrus Field, Anson Phelps, Henry Augustus Coit, Charles Heckscher, Philo Shelton, John Blair, Samuel Sloan, and the creative Scranton brothers of Pennsylvania. Together with Taylor, these men comprised a powerful managerial elite, and, in various combinations, were involved jointly in a wide range of commercial and industrial undertakings.

Moses Taylor was born in 1806 in a house on the corner of fashionable Broadway and Beaver Lane (now Morris Street) a few blocks from the busy waterfront where he would open his first store in 1832 at the age of 26. His business and personal influence kept pace with the rise of New York as the nation's principal business center. Due largely to the advent of the Erie Canal and the growth of the railroad, by the end of the 1830s New York was outstripping Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Albany in the competition for the frontier markets. The ambitious merchant/entrepreneurs of New York, seeking outlets through which to channel their excess wealth, had been colonizing the ore-fields of Pennsylvania and Ohio for nearly two decades. In the years after 1840 the growing concentration in New York of banking and insurance resulted in most railroad and mining main offices taking up residence in New York where there was quick money available, thus expanding the city's economic power and control.

Business was Taylor's birthright. His father, Jacob Bloom Taylor, was a cabinet-maker, merchant, and agent of John Jacob Astor, a Republican alderman, and an inspector of state prisons. Moses Taylor's grandfather and namesake came to New York from England in 1736 and became one of the city's leading merchants. The New York Gazette of 1750 tells us that his business was located "at the corner house opposite the Fly Market". After attending private schools in the city, Moses Taylor at the age of fifteen began his business career as an apprentice clerk at J. D. Brown. Shortly afterwards he moved to G. G. and S. S, Howland, a flourishing import/export house specializing in the West Indies trade during the first quarter of the 19th century. Taylor worked at Howland Brother's for ten years as an unpaid clerk and it was there that he began an economic involvement with Cuba that lasted over fifty years. The brothers encouraged Taylor to trade on his own before opening a store in 1832 as a commission agent. In the same year the country's first cholera epidemic broke out in New York, killing over 2,000 people, driving out many of its wealthy citizens, and forcing the suspension of all commercial activity. According to Daniel Hodas the trading house of Moses Taylor survived with an enhanced reputation for reliability and sound dealings. His business and some records also survived the fire of December 16-17, 1835, which destroyed over six hundred buildings in the business district.

When the Howland brothers retired, they offered Taylor a partnership with their nephew, William Aspinwall (the future developer of Panama). Taylor declined the offer, and with $15,000 of his savings, and J. J. Astor's backing, he established an import/export store. After a brief period of general trading he focused on the Cuban trade, which, in the first four decades of the 19th century, was surpassed only by Great Britain and France in the volume and value of exports to the United States. He began exploiting the connections in Cuba that he had cultivated during his apprenticeship with the Howland brothers, and within four years had established a regular shipping run to the West Indies. Moreover, the powerful Drake family of Havana made him their New York agent. This was an extraordinary indication of confidence which enhanced his position as a trader, and led to similar arrangements with other Spanish and Anglo-Cuban planters, most notably Tomas Terry.

The Industrial-Capitalist

In 1849 Taylor made changes to his business to accommodate his growing industrial investments. He set aside funds to bankroll that side of the business and made his long-term employee, Percy Pyne, a quarter partner in the new firm of Moses Taylor and Company. In time Pyne became Taylor's son-in-law and closest associate. English by birth, Pyne was educated at Christ's Hospital in London before emigrating to the United States. In 1836 at the age of sixteen he was hired by Taylor as a junior clerk, and in 1855 he married Taylor's daughter, Albertina, who was an active stockholder in many of her father's ventures. Pyne, whose ancestors originated in Spain and were named Pinos, acquired proficiency in Spanish and ultimately replaced Henry Augustus Coit as Taylor's representative in Cuba. Coit entered the Cuban trade in the late twenties, and for several years was a key figure in Taylor's early trading business. His command of Spanish and practiced social skills led to a partnership in the firm of the wealthy and powerful planter, Santiago Drake, the head of the Anglo-Cuban family. Taylor provided Coit with office and clerical help and in return Coit employed his contacts and expertise in Taylor's behalf. Coit was never a formal partner in Taylor's business, and in due course was replaced by Percy Pyne. Over the years Pyne served as an officer of virtually every company in which he and Taylor had a commanding interest. Pyne became in his own right an important industrial organizer and manager. Pyne's partnership, and the promotion two years later of another employee, Lawrence Turnure, enabled Taylor to expand the banking and investing side of the business, though the West Indian trade continued to be a reliable source of capital. Even so, it seems likely that by the end of the 1850s trade had been overshadowed by Taylor and Pyne's expanding involvement in industrial development. Bernstein, Iver. The New York City Draft Riots. Oxford University Press. 1990. "By the 1840s, specialized bankers, importers, jobbers, insurers, and brokers had increasingly rendered the generalist merchant of colonial times obsolete in New York and other eastern cities").

In 1837 Taylor was made a director of New York's City Bank (the forerunner of today's CitiBank and megabank Citicorp) in which he owned stock, and kept his and the firm's accounts. He also owned 15 percent of the shares of the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company (then affiliated with City Bank) and was the Chairman of its Executive Committee. During the illness in 1841 of City Bank's president, Gorham A. Worth, Taylor was appointed president pro tem of the bank. Taylor served pro tem again in 1854, and when Worth died Taylor was elected president, a position he held until his death in 1882, by which time he owned close to one third of the bank's stock. He was succeeded as president of the City Bank by Percy Pyne, who served until four years before his death in 1895. Chartered in 1812, over the years the City Bank had become powerful by loaning funds, discounting commercial papers and circulating banknotes, and by serving the interests of sugar merchants, cotton brokers, metal merchants, the largest New York gas companies, some southern railways, and the fortunes of the Vanderbilts. The bank also provided funds and influence for some of the industrial ventures of Taylor and his associates. This was an era when fortunes could be quickly made and quickly lost because the innovative technology of the period was a ravenous consumer of private wealth. A merchant who moved into industry without a dependable bank at his back was likely to go under without much delay. Taylor and Pyne's access to the cash reserves of one of the country's most important and fastest growing banks gave Moses Taylor and Company a secure base in the highly competitive world of industrial capitalism.

As a private investor Taylor joined with Cyrus Field and Peter Cooper in the first Atlantic cable venture. But his investing career may actually be dated from 1843 when he loaned money to the Forest Improvement Company, a venture in building short railway lines in the anthracite fields of eastern Pennsylvania. When Taylor reorganized his business in 1849, he began committing funds to the railroad, iron, coal, and gas industries. In short order he and his partners were involved in the affairs of the Cayuga & Susquehanna Railroad, which provided coal producers of the Schuylkill and Lehigh valleys with an outlet to western markets by way of Lake Cayuga and the Erie Canal; the Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Company, with August Belmont, Simon Cameron (later for a time Lincoln's Secretary of War) and Charles Heckscher; the Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western Railroad, one of Taylor's most important enterprises; the Jersey Shore Improvement Co., which, for a brief period, controlled rail access to New York harbor and the city; Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co., the Scranton brother's heart-breaker; the New Jersey Zinc & Iron Co., which became a major producer of spiegeleisen, a critical ingredient in the production of steel; the New York & Schuylkill Coal Co., always on the brink of failure and dependent on Taylor's large loans (3. In 1865 Taylor bought close to 12,000 shares in the New York & Schuylkill Coal Company. On May 15 of the same year the company's president, O. W. Davis, asked for military aid to put down striking miners. Earlier in May a former Union General, W. W. Duffield, had become the company's site superintendent).; the Penn Mining & Smelting Co., a failure, but not completely, because Taylor met there a mining engineer, Thomas Petherick, who would work with him in many future mining ventures; the Union Iron & Coal Co., a venture with Pyne, and Louis Von Hoffman (Taylor's associate at City Bank), Charles Heckscher; and a host of other enterprises too numerous to mention here.

Taylor's closest, most important and influential associate after Percy Pyne, was Charles Heckscher. He was born in Paris in 1806 and emigrated to the United States in 1829. Not long afterwards he established a commission and banking house, and began his life-long involvement in the anthracite region of Pennsylvania. He was instrumental in bringing Taylor into mineral development as an investor and manager. Over the years the two friends were associates in many enterprises, the New York & Schuylkill Coal Co. and Scranton Coal Company, being the most notable. At the time of his death in 1866 Heckscher was one of the leading mineowners in the United States.

By the time Taylor became active in the ore-fields of New Jersey and Pennsylvania he already possessed the essential ingredients for wielding power in industry: He had a solid standing as a merchant; he was a successful banker with widespread banking links and access to large sums of quick money; he enjoyed influential connections in the field of insurance; and he could rely on the good will of political friends and business associates. Evidently, Taylor was involved in the creation of only two industrial companies, the Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Company, and the Penn Mining and Smelting Company. It appears that Taylor preferred to pick up companies that were basically sound and had potential for growth, but were in poor financial shape due to mismanagement or lack of banking connections. His method as a financier seems to have been little different from other New York industrial financiers: He advanced loans, often in the form of quick cash, and, as quickly as possible he acquired blocks of stock which gave him financial control of the business enterprise. Then he would install his own site superintendent and engineers who would report directly to him in New York. The letters in the collection to Taylor and Pyne from Selden and Joseph Scranton reveal an industrial environment where constant suspicion and alert guardedness were indispensable instruments of survival. The Scranton brothers were inspired organizers but luckless managers and proved no match for the New York financiers whose loans they inevitably needed to carry out their imaginative industrial schemes. (Montgomery, David. Beyond Equality: Labor and the Radical Republicans, 1862-1872. University of Illinois Press. 1981. Writing about the Pennsylvania iron industry Montgomery says: "Here was an industry between the era of iron and the era of steel, beckoned forward by the great demand for rails and bridges provided by government-subsidized railroad promotion, but restrained by the fact that the new and necessary techniques were far too expensive to be financed by individual industrialists"). The friendly tone of many of the letters to Taylor suggest that he may have been less voracious than other New York financiers of the period.

The records of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co., provide a good illustration of Taylor's business methods. The company was founded in the mid-1830s by Selden and George Scranton on the site of what is now the city of Scranton in north-eastern Pennsylvania. The Scranton's were brought close to ruin by the economic depression of 1837, which caused the collapse of Pennsylvania's state public works. When the state withdrew its support from the railroad and other industries, Anson Phelps and William E. Dodge stepped in with financial aid. When Dodge became the director of the Erie Railroad, he induced the line's board to give the Scrantons a lucrative contract to make rails. In 1853 Taylor began investing in the company and in the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad and the Mount Hope Iron Company in New Jersey. By 1861 Taylor controlled the Mount Hope Iron Company, and he, joining with John I. Blair, and Charles Heckscher, persuaded Joseph Scranton of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co. to accept Taylor's share of the Mount Hope Iron Company (whose ore was needed by the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co). in exchange for stock in the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co. By the beginning of the Civil War the Mount Hope Iron Company had merged with the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co.. By this time Taylor owned 20% of the stock, making him one of the leading individual stockholders. At the same time he and Percy Pyne owned 25,000 shares in the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, which became the iron company's chief transporter. For the rest of his life Taylor was active in the affairs of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co., and in the mid-1870s he was a key figure in the company's conversion to steel.

Another typical enterprise, the New Jersey Zinc & Iron Co., was organized in 1848 as the New Jersey Zinc Co., to develop the zinc resources of Franklin (better known as Franklin Furnace), a village in Sussex County. By 1867 Taylor had acquired half of the company's stock. In the same year he purchased the leasehold of the Franklinite Iron Company. Whereupon he became embroiled in a drawn-out legal dispute between the two companies. The suits and counter-suits continued until 1880 when New Jersey Zinc negotiated a settlement which led to a merger of the companies and the formation of the New Jersey Zinc & Iron Co. In thirteen years Taylor had converted his leasehold into a one-half ownership of the most important zinc producer in the United States.

At the same time as Taylor was building his empire in nearby states he was acquiring controlling stock in New York City's two largest gas-light companies and buying stock in other utilities in Brooklyn and Long Island, Buffalo, Chicago, and Scranton. He soon had the two rival New York companies sharing technical information, and buying coal together from his mines, shipped to the city on his railroad over rails made from his iron. After two decades of internecine war (and two years after his death in 1882) the leading New York gas-light companies were merged to form the Consolidated Gas-Light Co. (now Consolidated Edison). Although the merger was orchestrated by Pyne and Taylor's close friend, Samuel Sloan, it resulted largely from the process begun by Taylor in the 1850s to rationalize competition in a cut-throat, expanding industry.

The War Democrat

Unlike his father, Taylor was not a public figure. But he was, by virtue of his wealth and standing, influential in the Democratic Party and Tammany Hall. Like many other New York businessmen, he had strong cotton and tobacco ties to the South. He was a member of the pro-southern Democratic Vigilance Association. He served as vice-president of a monster rally held at New York's Castle Garden in support of the Compromise Bill of 185 calling for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia and a stricter fugitive slave law. In 1856 he backed Buchanan's presidential candidacy. Two years later he sponsored a meeting which favored admitting Kansas to the Union on the basis of popular sovereignty. In 1860 he joined Astor, August Belmont, and Erastus Corning in backing Stephen Douglas. This is the profile of a supporter of slavery and unity, commonly referred to as a "conciliationist". On this thorny matter of slavery and wealthy New York Democratic merchant/capitalists like Taylor, it should be remembered that the profits derived from the slave-ridden Southern and West Indian cotton, tobacco, and sugar trades, was the basis of the fortunes of many northern merchant/capitalists. This wealth, directly related to slavery, fueled the Industrial Revolution.

Taylor was also a member of the inner circle of wealthy and privileged merchants, bankers, industrialists, and railroad attorneys gathered around August Belmont, the cultivated German banker and representative of the House of Rothschild. Belmont was also the New York leader of the Young America nationalist movement. Iver Bernstein writes that these Democratic businessmen were "the most racist upper-class group in the city" during the ante-bellum period. He also comments that Young America feared and opposed abolition as a "threat to the stability of an expanding white American empire" (Bernstein. Op. Cit). and asserts that they were as influential as any elite in American history. Merchant support for the South and slavery was potentially subversive to the North and a cause for deep concern, as was made clear by the violent, near-revolutionary anti-draft riots in New York (and other eastern cities), which were initially backed by Democratic merchants, and which ended in the Irish poor fighting the Union Army mere blocks from the exchange houses of lower Manhattan, and beating and killing poor ex-slaves. As Bernstein points out, the political choices of 1860-61 were made especially difficult by the "commitment of many New York merchants and Southern leaders to free trade and white supremacy". In a speech to the New York Common Council in January, 1861, Fernando Wood, the city's pro-Southern mayor, publicized the plan for New York to secede from the Union as a free-trade republic. This extreme course of action was debated openly by some Democratic merchants and considered privately by many more.

After Fort Sumter, Taylor, and other New York businessmen who were not manifestly opposed to slavery, joined the Union cause however. Although questions of motivation are always tricky, it may have been that the foremost concern for Taylor and his colleagues was not slavery or emancipation but the economic consequences for business of secession and the political and social disruption that must inevitably follow in its wake. Overseas markets were up for grabs, and the necessary global aggressiveness to win them was conceivable only in a unified and assertive nation with focused and coordinated political and economic goals. It could be argued that the eventual alliance of northern capitalists and Republican politicians, a key triumph for American capitalism, was as momentous for the United States as Emancipation. It was a coup, and at its core were opportunistic financiers and industrialists like Taylor and Percy Pyne, Charles Heckscher, August Belmont, Samuel Sloan, and Marshall O. Roberts, and their associates, friends, and business rivals.

In any case, Taylor and many of his his associates chose the Union. As chairman of the loan committee of the Associated Banks of New York, and as a member of the Treasury Note Commission, in the first year of the war Taylor worked with other eastern industrialists to raise a one hundred fifty million dollar loan for the war effort. He also helped to expand the Union navy, and became a staunch supporter of the Secretary of the Treasury, Salmon P. Chase. In July 1864 President Lincoln offered Taylor the important post of sub-treasurer of New York; but Taylor declined the position although pressured to accept by both Republicans and War Democrats. In 1864 he was appointed chairman of the campaign committee of the Union Republican Party formed to campaign for Lincoln's reelection. After Lincoln's death Taylor gave his support to Andrew Johnson with whom he shared a dislike of Radical Republicans and Reconstruction. In 1867 Taylor shifted his allegiance to U. S. Grant, but he continued to support Tammany at home, and was associated with the movement to change the New York City Charter it. With Astor, Marshall O. Roberts and others, Taylor served on a committee appointed to investigate Boss Tweed's Comptroller. In their report the committee cleared the city government of any wrongdoing. The New York Times condemned the report, while the editors of the New York Herald defended it. (New York Times and New York Herald, Nov. 7, 1870).

Not noted as a philanthropist, a few years before his death Taylor gave money to create a hospital in Scranton to provide free general medical care for employees, and their families, of the Delaware, Lackawanna, & Western Railroad and the Lackawanna Iron and Coal Company. Six years after Taylor's death, Moses Taylor and Company was dissolved by its three partners, Percy Pyne, Lawrence Turnure, and Percy Pyne Jr., who, except for the senior Pyne, formed a new company, Lawrence Turnure & Company. to reform New York's charter.

SCOPE AND ARRANGEMENT

The collection spans the years 1834-1889, and consists of 10 boxes of personal and family papers, and 316 boxes and 1200 Letterbooks and account books which document Taylor's affairs as merchant, banker, and industrial-capitalist.

They also shed light on the economic arrangements, social relationships, and managerial methods favored by Taylor in the anthracite coal country of eastern and central Pennsylvania where he built a nucleus of industrial companies that grew into a nationwide network. The evidence of his estate, estimated at between $40,000,000 and $45,000,000, and wide-ranging stock portfolio, testify to Taylor's significance as a merchant-capitalist. Though not comparable in size, capital, diversity, or influence, to the empires of a J. P. Morgan or a Cornelius Vanderbilt, as a model 19th century capitalist enterprise (Hodas, Moses, The Business Career of Moses Taylor, New York University, 1976. Hodas writes: "Taylor's evolution from small merchant to banker-industrialist illustrates the contribution one can make to a nation's economic growth. As a leading banker, Taylor headed financial institutions which aggregated the savings of individuals and channeled them into productive areas. He also had the capacity to make the kind of developmental decisions that were essential to continued economic expansion. His continuous merging of enterprises into larger units in order to increase their efficiency and profitability was a forerunner of the rationalization of American industry that took place at the turn of the century") Moses Taylor and Company holds up well.

The Moses Taylor papers are arranged in seven series:

1. Moses Taylor/Moses Taylor and Company
Correspondence and business records, 1834-1889. This series relates chiefly to trade in the West Indies (principally Cuba) in staple products, such as sugar and its popular derivatives, rum and molasses, and cotton, tobacco, spices, iron, railroad equipment and supplies, and other manufactured commodities. Included in the records are mercantile reports, shipping accounts, labor accounts, ships' manifestoes and log books, vessel and cargo insurance books, cargo books. The correspondence, about half of it in Spanish and French, is with commercial envoys and agents, planters, factors, bankers, shipbuilders, shipping agents, ship's captains, and others involved in the complex trading network. This series also contains material that relates to the activities of Taylor, his partners, and associates, field agents superintendents, engineers, and others, primarily in the railroad, iron ore, coal, and gas industries. Connected to the sugar trade, but arranged separately, is material relating to the Cuban Independence Movement (See Series V) of 1868-1878 led by landowners and bankers.

2. Personal papers
Estate Papers of Moses Taylor, consisting of correspondence, letterbooks, and assorted papers, 1882-1900; the estate papers of his father, Jacob Bloom Taylor, include a ledger and journal, 1853-1882; personal correspondence and accounts, 1860s-1870s, of Moses Taylor's son, Henry A. C. Taylor; and other family papers.

3. Papers of Business Partners and Associates
4. Records of Companies
5. Cuban Independence Movement (Ten Years War)
Letters, 1863-1888; copies of letters; 1873-1878; copies of letters to General Manuel Quesada, Carlos Manuel de Cespedes, and others, 1869-1876; account book, 1873; clippings; diario de las operacions, Matanzas; financial records; petty cash books; 1869-1878; receipt book, 1870;.

6. Records of other merchants
Many of the companies in this series pre-date or post-date Taylor and his firm. It is not known how the records of these merchants came to be in the collection. The bulk of the records in this series are those of Levi Coit, Coit & Smith, and William Coit, from 1796 through 1844. These merchants may have been associates of Taylor's father. In view of their names, however, it is more likely that they were related to Henry Augustus Coit, Taylor's former agent in the Cuban sugar trade, who may have inherited their records and stored them in his space in Taylor's South Street office. Some of the firms may have been Taylor's tenants.

7. Addenda
ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION

SOURCE OF ACQUISITION

Gift of Percy Pyne, Jr., and the Estate of Percy Pyne III, 1930, 1931; purchase, James Milgram, 1960

Taylor's personal papers and business records were given to the Library in 1930, 1931, and 1960 by the son of his partner and son-in-law, Percy Pyne, and the Estate of Pyne's grandson.

PROCESSING INFORMATION

Compiled by Richard Salvato

KEY TERMS

NAMES

Coit, Henry Augustus
Heckscher, Charles C., 1949-
Pyne, Percy Rivington
Shelton, Philo
Taylor, Henry Augustus Coit
Taylor, Jacob Bloom
Taylor, Moses, 1806-1882
Turnure, Lawrence
Cayuga and Susquehanna Railroad Company
Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Company
City Bank (New York, N.Y.)
Harvey Screw and Bolt Company
Jersey Shore Improvement Company
Lackawanna Iron and Coal Company (Scranton, Pa.)
Moses Taylor and Company
New Jersey Zinc and Iron Company
Penn Mining and Smelting Company
St. Louis and Hannibal Railroad Company
Union Iron and Coal Company
SUBJECTS

Americans -- Foreign countries
Business
Capitalists and financiers
Coal mines and mining -- United States
Entrepreneurship
Foreign trade and employment
Industrial organization
Industrial relations -- United States
International trade
Investments -- Cuba
Labor
Mines and mineral resources -- United States
Railroads -- Pennsylvania
Railroads -- United States
Slavery -- Cuba
Sugar
PLACES

Cuba -- Commerce -- United States
Cuba -- History -- Insurrection, 1868-1878
New York (State) -- History
United States -- Commerce -- Cuba
OCCUPATIONS

Bankers
USING THE COLLECTION

LOCATION

Manuscripts and Archives Division
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street, New York, NY 10018-2788
Brooke Russell Astor Reading Room, Third Floor, Room 328
ACCESS TO MATERIALS

Advance notice required. Request access to this collection.
ALTERNATIVE FORM AVAILABLE

Mercantile Weekly Report and Havana Prices Current, 1857-1858 available on microfilm; New York Public Library

Box 305, folders 1-19 and vols. 808-812 available on microfilm; New York Public Library; *ZL-202

Moses Taylor papers
1793-1906 [bulk 1835-1890]
http://archives.nypl.org/mss/2955 

 Records of Companies
(a) Cayuga & Susquehanna Railroad Co
In 1853 John J. Phelps, William Dodge, and the Scranton brothers organized the Leggetts Gap Railroad in northeastern Pennsylvania. In the same year this road became the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad (see below). Taylor joined the Board of Directors, and realizing the road's geographical limits, joined with Phelps, Henry Young, and Samuel Willetts to lease and operate for forty years the Cayuga and Susquehanna Railroad, thus providing the coal producers of the Schuylkill and Lehigh Valleys with an outlet to western markets by way of Lake Cayuga and the Erie Canal.
Correspondence, 1852-1890; letterbook, 1855-1859; cash books, 1852-1860; deposits book, 1852-1855; dividends book, 1853-1878; and interest coupons.

b. 251
Correspondence 1852-1890
b. 251
Letterbook 1855 February 7-1859 June 2
b. 252
Records; bankbooks
b. 253
Records (vouchers unsorted)
v. 591
Cash book 1852 January 29-1859 February 28
v. 592
Cash book 1859 March 8-1860 June 4
v. 593
Deposits book 1852 May-1855 April
v. 594
Dividends book 1853-1878
Interest coupons 1850-1855
v. 595
1850 July 1-1859 July 1
v. 596
1852 July 1-1855 January 1
v. 597
1853 July 1-1858 July 1
v. 598
1854-1859
(b) Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Co
Taylor and Charles Heckscher joined August Belmont, Simon Cameron, and others in purchasing iron ore property in Columbia, Pennsylvania. Bought at a sheriff's sale, the property was conveyed to the newly-chartered Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Company not far from Philadelphia. Over the next fifteen years Taylor and Percy Pyne gained control of the company. Although Taylor unwaveringly supported the company it would prove to be one of his less successful ventures, and a decade after his death in 1882, his executors foreclosed the mortgage and declared bankruptcy. Of special interest in this series are the letters of two resident supervisors, Eugene Border, to his uncle, Charles Heckscher, and Charles Nourse to Percy Pyne. Together these letters form a fluent managerial chronicle of strikes and labor disputes, engineering concerns, technological innovations, improvements, and improvisations, weather conditions, and the routine problems of road building and management.
Letterbooks, 1879-1892; correspondence, 1881-c1892; letters from resident superintendents, 1851-1880; minutes of the meetings of the Board of Directors, 1851-1893, 1901; account books of the Receiver, S. S. Palmer, 1893-1900; papers, 1853-1864 of an Agent, George Campbell, Checking account books, 1879-1892; day book, 1859-1864; journals and ledgers 1851-1892; weekly blast furnace reports, 1879-1892; mortgage income bond transfer book, 1885-1894; map of property; and drafts of two tracts of land.
See also: Oversize Charter Case: Map of property of Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Co.; draft of two tracts of land in West Hempfield Township, Lancaster County, [Pennsylvania] surveyed for the Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Co., July 17, 1860

b. 254
Letterbooks 1879 September-1892 October 7
b. 255
Letters from resident superintendents, Eugene Border to Charles Heckscher and Charles Nourse to Percy Pyne 1851-1869
b. 256
Letters to Percy Pyne from resident superintendents 1870-1880
b. 257
Letters 1881-1882 August
b. 258
Letters 1883 September-189y; undated
b. 259
Deeds, leases, and mortgages
b. 260-269
Unsorted records
v. 600
Account book of S. S. Palmer, Receiver 1893
v. 601
Bills receivable 1891 January 30-1892 February 14
v. 601
Bills payable 1890 December 14-1892 July 15
v. 602
Bills rendered 1891 October 31-1892 September 21
Cash Books 1859-1893
v. 603
George Campbell, Agent 1853 January 12-1859 July 9
v. 604
George Campbell, Agent 1859 July 22-1864 January 23
v. 605
George Campbell, Agent 1859 July 1-1864 March 23
v. 606
Checkbook, National City Bank 1891 March 4-1893 October 7
Checking Account Books 1879-1892
v. 607
1879 October 3-1880 August 10
v. 608
1883 August 11-1886 February 8
v. 609
1886 February 20-1887 October 13
v. 610
1887 October 21-1891 March 2
v. 611
1889 April-1894 April 14
v. 612
1892 February 1-1893 July 24
Contracts for Pig Iron 1879-1892
v. 613
1879 December 13-1882 September 21
v. 614
1882 November-1887
v. 615
1888-1892
v. 616
Day book 1859 July 1-1864 May 17
Journals 1851-1892
v. 617
1851 July 3-1865 September 2
v. 618
1865 October 2-1870 November 1
v. 619
1870 November 1-1880 July
v. 620
1880 July-1884 April
v. 621
1884 April-1887 December
v. 622
1887 December-1892 February
v. 623
1892 February-1893 July
Ledgers 1851-1889
v. 624
1851 August 4-1879 September 1
v. 625
1859 July 12-1864 March 30
v. 626
1879-1887
v. 627
1889 December 31-1892 December 31
v. 628
Minutes of the Meetings of the Board of Directors 1851-1893, 1901
v. 629
Memoranda of Notes Receivable 1891 August-1892 November
v. 629
Shipments of concentrated Ore 1892 May 2-1893 June 30
v. 629
Insurance 1892-1893
Memoranda of Loans 1890-1892
v. 630
Mortgage Income Bond Transfer Book 1885 May 7-1894 July 26
v. 631
Pig iron stock book 1864 September-1867 November 30
v. 632
Receiver's Account Book 1893-1900
v. 633
Sales Book 1879 December 12-1880 December 4
v. 634
Stock Ledger 1870s-1890s
v. 635
Stock Transfer Book 1851 August 5-1894 July 26
Weekly Blast Furnace Reports 1879-1892
v. 636
1879 November 29-1880 December 31
v. 637
1881
v. 638
1882
v. 639
1883
v. 640
1884 January 11-1885 July 24
v. 641
1885 August 1-1886 July 31
v. 642
1886 August 6-1887 July 29
v. 643
1887 August 5-1888 November 5
v. 644
1890 February 15-1891 April 18
v. 645
1891 April 25-1892 September 10
b. 270
(c) Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Co
Founded in 1853 as a coal carrier, the Delaware Lackawanna & Western Railroad was one of Taylor's most creative enterprises. In 1854 he bought $25,000 worth of stock in the company and joined fellow New York merchants on the Board of directors. Through the leasing of the Cayuga and Susquehanna (see above) and other roads, and by constructing new track and absorbing several strategic trunk lines, Taylor and his associates expanded the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad eastward to tidewater and westward into the heartland.
Letters to Moses Taylor and Percy Pyne relating to the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co. [Also See below], 1859-1861; General letters, 1851-1900; Annual Reports, 1858, 1860-1862; coal sales at auction, 1863, Feb. 25-1864, April 27; accounts.
Letters to Taylor and Pyne chiefly relating to the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Company, 1859-1861; general correspondence, 1851-1900; annual reports, 1858, 1860-1862; coal sales at auction, 1863-1864.
See also: Oversize Charter Case, Industrial drawings

(d) Harvey Screw and Bolt Co
The relationship of this business to Taylor, or to his business, is not known.
Interoffice correspondence, 1883-1886; incoming letters, 1882-1886; letterbooks, 1881-1887; ledger and journals, 1881-1894; minutes of meetings of the Board of Directors, 1881-1890; account book, 1882-1883; memorandum ledger, 1883-1885; stock transfer book, 1883-1886; and scrapbooks, chiefly on naval armor, 1893-1894.

b. 271
Interoffice correspondence 1883-1886
Letters 1882-1886
b. 272
1882-1883
b. 273
1883 July-December
b. 274
1883 July-1886 January
b. 275
1884 January-May
b. 276
1884 June-December
b. 277
1884-1886
b. 278
1885 January-June
b. 279
1885 July-December
b. 280
1886 January-October
b. 281
Mortgages; records relating to patents; Minutes of Special Meeting July 9, 1886
b. 282
Bills; payrolls 1883 September-1885 April
b. 283
Bills 1883-1886
b. 284-285
Unsorted records
b. 286
Inventory Books / Bank Books July 1, 1882-December 29, 1882
v. 646
Letterbook 1881-1885
v. 647
Letterbook 1885-1887
v. 648
Account Book 1882 April 28-1883 July 2
v. 649
Bills Receivable and payable 1882-1886
v. 650
Cash book 1883 May 25-1894 August 4
v. 651
Checkbook 1881 February 15-1883 July 2
v. 652
Inventories 1883-1885
v. 653
Journal 1881-1894
v. 654
Journal 1883-1894
v. 655
Ledger 1881-1886
v. 656
Ledger (indexed) 1883-1886
v. 657
Memorandum Ledger (indices) 1883 July 1-1885
v. 658
Minutes of Meetings of Board of Directors 1881 February 5-1890 February 26
v. 659-660
Scrapbooks chiefly on naval armor 1893-1894, 1897-1898
v. 661
Stock Certificates 1883 August 29-1886 April 9
v. 662
Stock Transfer Book 1883-1886
(e) Jersey Shore Improvement Co
In 1854, through this company, Taylor, John J. Phelps, Charles Heckscher, and Marshall O. Roberts, bought property in New Jersey on the Hudson River shore near the shortest river crossing to New York City. In a complicated deal involving several railroads, the property near Hoboken was sold to the Delaware Lackawanna & Western Railroad (see above). Taylor played a central role in the negotiations which led to the expansion of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad and the acquisition of the terminal site.
Minutes of meetings, 1854; meetings of stockholders, 1858; stocks and bonds record book, c1850s; expensives account book, 1867-1879; accounts ledger, 1857-1863; journal, 1855-1882.

b. 287
Accounts
v. 663
Accounts Ledger 1855-1882
v. 664
Bond Ledger 1857-1863
v. 665
Checkbook 1879 April 21-1882 December 12
v. 666
Expenses Account Book 1867 February 5-1879 April 21
v. 667
Journal 1855 December 28-1882 December 30
v. 668
Meetings of Stockholders 1858 March 4
v. 669
Minutes of Meetings 1854 May-1883 June 4
v. 670
Scow Accounts 1866
v. 671
Scrip Certificates 1855 December 28-1857 July 18
v. 672
Stocks & Bonds Record 1850s?
(f) Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co
Letters, 1853-1899; letterpress book, 1864-1868; loose accounts.
See the Historical Note, page 6 for brief description of this company and Taylor's relationship to it.

b. 288
Letters 1853-1899
See also: Delaware, Box 270, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Co.

b. 288
Letterpress Book 1864 March 17-1868 December 1
b. 288
Accounts
(g) New Jersey Zinc & Iron Co
Organized in 1848 as the New Jersey Zinc Company to develop the zinc resources of Sussex County. See the Historical Notes, page 7, for a brief description of this company and Taylor's relationship to it.
Letters to Moses Taylor and Company, 1855-1901; letterbooks, 1890-1900; accounts; dividends declarations, 1899, 1900; stock transfer book, 1880-1888; transfer sheets, 1899, 1900; comparison of profits for 1897 and 1898; payrolls; daily reports, 1896 (incomplete); case record, Moses Taylor vs. New Jersey Zinc Company; Checking account books, 1880-1895; dividend checks, 1881-c1893; Journals, 1880-1893; invoices, 1895, 1896.

b. 289
Letters to 1855-1901
b. 289
Dividends declarations 1899-1900
b. 289
Transfer sheets 1899-1900
b. 289
Comparison of profits for 1897 and 1898
b. 290
Payrolls 1895
b. 291
Accounts
b. 292
Case record: Moses Taylor vs. New Jersey Zinc Co
b. 293
Daily Reports 1896 June December
(Incomplete).
See also: Volume 683

Checking Account Books 1880-1895
See also: Box 293

v. 673
1880 October 30-1882 May 15
v. 674
1882 May 15-1883 October 31
v. 675
1883 October 31-1885 February 16
v. 676
1885 February 16-1886 July 14
v. 677
1886 July 14-1887 November 15
v. 678
1887 November 15-1889 May 31
v. 679
1889 June 1-1890 October 16
v. 680
1890 October 16-1892 February 15
v. 681
1892 February 16-1893 January 3
v. 682
1893 July 14-1895 March 28
v. 683
Daily Reports 1896 January 1-May 31
v. 684
Dividends Book 1882 April 1-1886 April 1
v. 685
Dividends Book 1886 June 16-1890 February 20
v. 686
Dividends Book 1890 May-1892 November 21
Dividend Checks 1882-circa 1893
v. 687
1882, 1883
v. 688
1883
v. 689
circa 1886
v. 690
1888
v. 691
1888
v. 692
circa 1890
v. 693
circa 1892
v. 694
circa 1892
v. 695
circa 1893
v. 696
Invoices 1895, 1896
Journals 1880-1893
v. 697
1880 November 7-1884 April
v. 698
1884 April-1887 May
v. 699
1887 May-1890 June
v. 700
1890 June-1893 June
v. 701
1893 June-1896 April
v. 702
List of Stockholders
v. 703
Ledger 1880-1894
Letterbooks 1890-1900
v. 704
1890 November 17-1894 March 14
v. 705
1892 January 8-1894 July 3
v. 706
1894 July 5-1896 January 2
v. 707
1898 August 15-1899 January 7
v. 708
1898 August 29-1899 July 19
v. 709
1898 December 8-1902 January 6
v. 710
1899 January 9-July 13
v. 711
1899 July 13-December 27
v. 712
1899 December 27-1900 May
v. 713
1900 May 2-August 25
v. 714
Stock Transfer Book 1880 November 22-1888 January 18
(h) New York & Schuylkill Coal Co
Taylor began his involvement in the anthracite coal fields of eastern Pennsylvania as early as 1843 when he loaned money to the Forest Improvement Company which had succeeded the New York and Schuylkill Coal Company with Charles Heckscher as principal operator. The New York and Schuylkill Company was started in 1823 by New York capitalists. In 1865 the company reverted to its original name, New York and Schuylkill Coal Company, and in June of 1867 it closed down operations. Three years later it reopened as the Manhattan Coal Company.
Letters to the house of Moses Taylor and Moses Taylor and Company, 1830-1871; letterbooks, 1866, 1867; correspondence of O. W. Davis, president of the company, 1865, 1866; letters of O. W. Davis, president of the company, to former Union general, W. W. Duffield, field superintendent, 1865; letterbooks of O. W. Davis, 1865-1866; correspondence of the treasurers, G. W. Cushing, 1865, and David Palmer, 1866, 1867; account of letters received, 1865-1867; accounts ledger, 1865-1868; accounts with boat captains; account sales at 14th Street Yard, New York City, 1866, 1867; bills outstanding, 1864, 1865; cash ledger, 1866, 1867; canal ship ping accounts, 1867; checkbooks, 1865-1867; scrip and certificate books, 1865-1876.

b. 294
Letters to 1830-1871
Taylor's loans to the Forest Improvement Co.; List of chief shareholders in the Manhattan Coal Co.; Meetings of Board of Directors, 1829, 1830, 1867, 1868-1870; organization of the Manhattan Coal Co.; Agreements; Weigh Office statistics, 1866; legislative acts relating to the New York & Schuylkill Coal Co., and the Forest Improvement Co.; accounts.

b. 295-297
Accounts
b. 298
Coal accounts; inventories, and other oversize accounts
Correspondence of O. W. Davis, President 1865-1866
v. 715
Letters to 1865 June 9-December 18
v. 716
Letterbook of Davis (indexed) 1865 January 9-July 31
v. 717
Letterbook of Davis 1865 August 1-December 30
v. 718
Letterbook of Davis 1866 January 8-June 15
v. 719
Letters from Davis to W. W. Duffield 1865 August 16-December 30
Correspondence of the Treasurers 1865-1867
v. 720
G. W. Cushing 1865 August 19-October 31
v. 721
David Palmer 1866 July 2-September 29
v. 722
David Palmer 1867 May 1-July 31
Letterbooks 1866-1867
v. 723
1866 January 2-March 31
v. 724
1866 April 2-June 30
v. 725
1866 October-December 31
v. 726
1867 January 2-April 30
v. 727
1867 January 7-July 1
v. 728
Account of letters received 1865-1867
v. 729
Accounts ledger 1865-1868
v. 730
Accounts with boat captains
v. 731
Account sales at 14th Street Yard, New York City 1866 January 2-1867 April 14
v. 732
Account sales at 14th Street, New York City 1867 April 10-June 26
v. 733
Bills outstanding 1864 January 28-1865 April 21
v. 734
Bills outstanding 1865 May 8-1866 October 30
v. 735
Bills Receivable 1865 April 10-1867 June
Discount line with City Bank.

v. 736
Cash ledger 1866 October 2-1867 August 30
v. 737
Canal shipping accounts 1867
v. 738
Stock certificates (blank)
Checkbooks 1865-1867
v. 739
1865 July 24-1867 July 3
v. 740
1865 February 8-1866 July 16
v. 741
1865 July 8-1867 June 13
v. 742
1866 July 11-1867 January 17
v. 743
Contracts for cargo vessels 1863 September 11-1865 December 6
v. 744
Coal Book 1844 April 13-1846 November 7
v. 745
Coal order book 1865 September 13-November 18
v. 746
Coal orders and deliveries 1865
v. 747
Coal orders and deliveries 1866 February 9-1867 June
v. 748
Coal sales 1865 June 5-1866 October 27
v. 749
Coal sales 1866 October 30-1867 June 22
v. 750
Coal shipments to Phillips Wharf 1864
v. 750
Supply bills 1866 October 6-1867 January 2
v. 751
Commission accounts 1865 April-1867 June 20
v. 752
Daily shipments of cars from the mines 1865-1867
v. 752
Weekly tonnage 1865-1867
v. 753
Index to coal sales ledger No. 1
v. 754
Journal 1865 February-1868 December
v. 755
Ledger kept at Pottsville 1828 May 16-1830 April 9
v. 756
Memoranda (Mines) 1865-1867
v. 757
Mule towage; wharfage & unloading 1863
v. 758
Bank Account Book (National City Bank) 1866
v. 759
Bank Account Book (City Bank) 1865
v. 760
Order Book 1866 August 16-1867 June 25
v. 761
Petty Cash Book 1865 June 19-1867 July 31
v. 762
Resident manager's account book 1865-1867
Scrip & Certificate Book 1865-1876
v. 763
(Index) 1865
v. 764
1869
v. 765
1871
v. 766
1876
v. 767
Shipment's of coal to Fisk s Wharf, Boston 1864
v. 768
Transfer of Stock 1835-1854
v. 769
Wharfage Book 1855-1858, 1866
See also: Oversize Charter Case, map of coal areas; Manhattan Coal Co.

v. 769a
Tracts at Heckcherville 1869
Deeds to the company (Land Agents Office).

(i) Penn Mining & Smelting Co
In 1850 Taylor joined with Charles Heckscher, Thomas Petherick (a mining engineer who assisted Taylor in many ventures) and his Cuban sugar associates, Henry A. Coit and Philo Shelton, to form the Penn Mining and Smelting Company near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The company ceased operations and was dissolved in 1855.
Letters to Moses Taylor and Company, 1831, 1849-1864; minutes of the Board of directors, 1850-1856; meetings of the Board of Directors, 1850-1853; charter; accounts; treasurer's reports, shelton agreement; costs of mining, 1849, 1850; capital stock transfer book, 1850-1855; stock certificate book, 1850-1855; stock ledger, 1850-1856; checkbook, 1851-1853; Copper Mining in Great Britain and Ireland, by Thomas Perick, 1849.

b. 299
Letters to 1831, 1849-1864
b. 300
Various
Costs of mining, 1849, 1850; charter; shelton agreement; treasurer 's reports; leases; proxies; Meetings of the Board of Directors, 1850-1853; lands; Copper Mining in Great Britain and Ireland, by Thomas Petherick, 1849; accounts.

v. 770
Capital stock transfer book 1850 August 6-1855 January 13
v. 771
Checkbook 1851-1853
v. 772
Minutes of the Board of Directors 1850 April 6-1856 July
v. 773
Stock Certificate Book 1850 May-1855 June 30
v. 774
Stock Ledger 1850 June 13-1856 July 24
(j) St. Louis and Hannibal Railroad Co
Taylor's Estate held considerable stock through Percy Pyne and Stephen Palmer in this company which had track running northwest from St. Louis through Missouri and Iowa. Both Pyne and Palmer served as presidents, as did John I. Blair, Taylor's associate in many industrial enterprises. In 1885 the company expanded by acquiring the St. Louis, Hannibal, and Keokuk Railroad.

b. 301
Letters 1883-1895
+ records.

(k) Union Iron and Coal Co. (Phoenix Iron and Coal Co)
Taylor, Percy Pyne, Charles Heckscher, and Lewis Von Hoffman, a broker and Taylor's associate at City Bank, purchased the property of the Phoenix Iron and Coal Company near Scranton, Pennsylvania (a. k. a. Phoenix Iron and Coal Company). In addition Taylor turned over to the company close to 2,000 acres of land he owned in the area.
Letters, 1853-1858, 1860; minutes of the Board of Directors, 1852-1858; minutes of Meeting of the Phoenix Iron and Coal Company, 1853; 1854, 1855; minutes of Meetings of the Union Iron & Coal Company, 1854-1859; bills payable, 1857-1858; daily journals, 1857, 1858; journal, Phoenix Iron and Coal Company, 1853-1855; ledger (abandoned) three entries, 1853, 1854; stock ledger, 1854-1858; stock transfer book, Phoenix Iron and Coal company, 1853, 1854; stock transfer book, 1854-1858.

b. 302
Letters 1853-1858, 1860
b. 302
Minutes of the Board of directors 1852-1858
b. 303
Records
v. 775
Bills Payable 1857 February 16-1858 March 22
v. 776
Checkbook 1857 February 18-1858 August 3
v. 778
Daily Journal 1857
v. 779
Daily Journal 1858
v. 780
Journal 1853 April 12-1858 December 31
v. 781
Journal, Phoenix Iron & Coal Co 1853 April 12, 1854 February 13-1855 January
v. 782
Ledger (abandoned) three entries 1853 April 12, 1854 February 14, 1854 June
v. 783
Minutes of Meetings, Phoenix Iron and Coal Co 1853 May 14-1854 February 13
v. 783
Minutes of Meetings, Union Iron & Coal Co 1854 June 13-1859 January 5
v. 784
Stock Ledger 1854 July 5-1858
v. 785
Stock Transfer Book, Phoenix Iron & Coal Co 1853 April 14-1854 June 21
v. 786
Stock Transfer Book 1854 July 5-1858
(l) Miscellaneous industrial companies
b. 304 f. 1
Albert Mining Co
b. 304 f. 2
Atchinson, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 3
Atlantic Telegraph Co
b. 304 f. 4
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 5
Backman Valley Railroad Co
See also: Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Co.

b. 304 f. 6
Bank of California
b. 304 f. 7
Bayonne & Greenville (N. J). Gas Light Co
b. 304 f. 8
Brooklyn City Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 9
Buffalo Gas Light Co
b. 304 f. 10
Central Car Co
b. 304 f. 11
Central Railroad Bank (Central railroad & Banking Co. of Georgia)
b. 304 f. 12
Central Railroad Company of New Jersey
b. 304 f. 13
Chicago & West Michigan Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 14
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 15
Chicago Gas Light & Coke Co
b. 304 f. 16
Chicago, Pekin & South Western Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 17
Chicago, St. Louis & Western Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 18
Chicago, Wilmington & Vermillion Coal Co
b. 304 f. 19
Chicago, Wisconsin & Minnesota Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 20
Consolidated Gas Co. of New York
b. 304 f. 21
Cotton States Life Insurance Co
b. 304 f. 22
Crown Point Iron Co
b. 304 f. 23
C. W. Sexton Mine
b. 304 f. 24
Detroit, Lansing & Northern Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 25
Everett Land Co
b. 304 f. 26
Fort Wayne & Jackson Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 27
Goshen Hole (Wyoming) Irrigation
b. 304 f. 28
Green Bay & Western Railroad Co. Kewaunee, Green Bay & Western Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 29
Green Bay, Winona & St. Paul Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 30
Houston & Texas Central Railway
b. 304 f. 31
Hudson River railroad Co
b. 304 f. 32
Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 33
Kansas City, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad Co.; Kansas City, Springfield & Memphis Railroad Co.; Kansas City, Lawrence & Southern Kansas Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 34
Lackawanna & Bloomsburg Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 35
Lackawanna Iron & Steel Co
b. 304 f. 36
Lehigh Valley Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 37
Mahanoy & Broad Mountain Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 38
Manhattan Gas Light Co
b. 304 f. 39
Marquette, Houghton & Ontonagon Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 40
Metropolitan Gas Light Co
b. 304 f. 41
Metropolitan Street Railway Co
b. 304 f. 42
Mexican Telegraph Co
b. 304 f. 43
Michigan Central Railway Co
b. 304 f. 44
Milwaukee Gas Light Co
b. 304 f. 45
Mine Hill & Schuylkill Haven Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 46
New Jersey West Light Railroad
b. 304 f. 47
New York & Texas Land Co. Ltd
b. 304 f. 48
New York & Hudson River Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 49
New York Gas Light Co
b. 304 f. 50
New York Life Insurance & Trust Co
b. 304 f. 51
New York, Newfoundland & London Telegraph Co
b. 304 f. 52
Northern Pacific Railroad
b. 304 f. 53
Oregon Pacific Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 54
Oxford Furnace
b. 304 f. 55
Paterson & New York Plank Road co
See also: Volumes 793-796

b. 304 f. 56
Pennsylvania Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 57
Pennsylvania Steel Co
b. 304 f. 58
Pequa Railroad & Improvement Co
b. 304 f. 59
Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 60
Philadelphia & Trenton Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 61
Reading Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 62
Rome, Watertown & Ogdenburg Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 63
Scranton Coal Co
b. 304 f. 64
Shawnee Iron Works
(See also: Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Co).

b. 304 f. 65
Sioux City & P Pacific Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 66
South Carolina Railway Co
b. 304 f. 67
South Missouri Land Co
b. 304 f. 68
Steward Iron Mining Co
b. 304 f. 69
Sumner County Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 70
Texas & Houston Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 71
Union Pacific Railway Co
b. 304 f. 72
Union Stockyard & Transit Co
b. 304 f. 73
West Fairmont & Marion Consolidated Gas Coal Co
b. 304 f. 74
West & Atlantic Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 75
West Union Telegraph Co
b. 304 f. 76
Wisconsin central Railroad Co
b. 304 f. 77
Single items
v. 787
City Bank, Securities 1875
v. 788
Species Book 1823-1826
v. 789
Florence Zinc Co., Letterbook 1897 January 7-April 2
v. 790
International Railroad Co., Ledger 1870-1873
v. 791
Joliet Iron & Steel Co., Bond Register 1871-1874
v. 792
List of investors 1887
v. 793
Paterson & New York Plank Road Co
Accounts, 1861, June 3-1879, Feb. 15; dividends, 1862-1873.

v. 794
Paterson & New York Plank Road Co., capital stock transfer book 1861 June 17-1878 September 12
v. 795
Paterson & New York Plank Road Co., Minutes of the Committee 1861 June13-1862 March 10
v. 796
Paterson & New York Plank Road Co., tolls 1866-1867, 1877
See also: 55

v. 797
Scranton, folder Coal Co. (?), auction sale of Scranton coal 1866-1867
v. 798
Scranton Coal Co., ledger 1854-1866
v. 799
Scranton Coal Co
Minutes of the Board of directors, 1854, Nov. 23-1867, Aug. 30; George Scranton, See also: Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; Joseph H. Scranton; See also: Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co.; Seldon T. Scranton, See also: Lackawanna Iron & Coal Co.; Oxford Furnace.

v. 800
Thomas Iron Works, weekly furnace reports 1858
v. 801
Thomas Iron Works, weekly furnace reports 1860
v. 802
Thomas Iron Works, weekly furnace reports 1861
v. 803
Thomas Iron Works, weekly furnace reports 1862
v. 804
Thomas Iron Works, weekly furnace reports 1867
v. 805
Thomas Iron Works, weekly furnace reports 1873
v. 806
Union Mutual Insurance Co., Minutes of Proceedings 1845-1874
and other records.

v. 807
Union Mutual Insurance Co., renewal of charter January 8, 1875
v. 807
Board Meetings 1875 January 23-1878 January 31
5. Cuban Independence Movement (Ten Years War) 1868-1878
Over these years wealthy sugar planters and urban bankers succeeded in compelling the Spanish government to remove some of the constraints on their plans to expand the sugar industry. Taylor acted as a banker, handling funds transferred from Cuba to New York and New Orleans. The firm also acted as agents for the movement in obtaining armaments and other supplies. Taylor and Pyne were uniquely suited for their roles of agent and banker by virtue of their long and mutually profitable association with many of the planters and bankers (such as Gelato and Company) which were involved in the movement, and by their sympathy for the movement's desire to rid Cuba of Spanish rule and its restraints on the expansion of the sugar industry. Included in this section are correspondence, political and military records, financial records and accounts books, pamphlets and leaflets, the Letterbook of Carlos de Castillo, copies of letters to Manuel Quesada, Carlos Manuel de Cespedes, and others.
Letters, 1863-1888; copies of letters; 1873-1878; copies of letters to General Manuel Quesada, Carlos Manuel de Cespedes, and others, 1869-1876; account book, 1873; clippings; diario de las operacions, Matanzas; financial records; petty cash books; 1869-1878; receipt book, 1870;.

b. 305
Letters 1863-1888, undated
Fragments; Diario de las operacions, Matanzas.

b. 306
Political and military records
b. 307
Financial records; clippings
b. 308
Pamphlets and leaflets
b. 309
Newspapers
v. 808
Letterbook of Carlos de Castillo 1874 July 18-1875 July 13
v. 809
Copies of letters to General Manuel Quesada, Carlos
Manuel de Cespedes, and others 1869 December 7-1876 June 28
v. 810
Copies of letters 1873 March 18-1874 June 28
v. 811
Copies of letters 1875 July 20-1878 July 26, 1876 July 17-1878 January 15
v. 812
Copies of letters 1878 June 19-September 14
v. 813
Account book 1870-1871
v. 814
Account book 1873
v. 815
Petty cash book 1869 December 6-1878 July 24
v. 816
Petty cash book 1872, 1876
v. 817
Receipt book 1870
6. Records of other merchants
Many of the companies in this series pre-date or post-date Taylor and his firm. It is not known how the records of these merchants came to be in the collection. The bulk of the records in this series are those of Levi Coit, Coit & Smith, and William Coit, from 1796 through 1844. These merchants may have been associates of Taylor's father. In view of their names, however, it is more likely that they were related to Henry Augustus Coit, Taylor's former agent in the Cuban sugar trade, who may have inherited their records and stored them in his space in Taylor's South Street office. Some of the firms may have been Taylor's tenants.

(a) Brinkerhoff & Wilson
b. 310
Unsorted letters and records
v. 818
Letterbook 1836 April-October
v. 819
Letterbook 1836 May 11-December 10
v. 820
Letterbook 1836 October 27-December 10
v. 821
Accounts current 1836 December 31-1840 January 18
v. 822
Account sales 1835 April 27-1836 October 28
v. 823
Bill book 1835 July 9-1836 March 28
v. 824
Bill book 1836 April 25-June 17
v. 825
Bill book 1836 June 3-October
v. 826
Checkbook, Bank of America 1836
v. 827
Checkbook, Union Bank 1836
v. 828
Disbursements 1835 January 1-1837 January
v. 828
Accounts current 1834-1837
v. 829
Invoices & sales 1835 March 2-1837 November 10
v. 830
Invoices & sales 1836 March-November 16
v. 831
Journal 1834 June 30-1837 January
v. 832
Journal 1836 April 1-December 6
v. 833
Ledger 1834 June 31-1837
v. 834
Notes 1834 April 21-1836 July 23
v. 835
Notes 1836 April 18-October 6
v. 836
Receipt 1836 May 6-December 22
v. 837
Sales book 1836 April-October 15
v. 838
Ship receipts 1836
(b) Elisha & William Coit
b. 311
Correspondence 1793-1813, undated
+ records.

(c) William Coit
b. 312
Correspondence 1795-1813, undated
b. 312
Records 1792-1812, undated
b. 312
Declaration of citizenship and other personal papers
v. 839
Letterbook 1798 May 31-1803 June 4
v. 839
Accounts 1798
v. 840
Letterbook 1810 January 28-1813 June 12
v. 841
Account book 1794-1798
Also contains letter to John Jacob Astor.

v. 842
Accounts current 1799-1806
+ invoice of sundries shipped from Bordeaux.

v. 843
Account book 1806-1813
v. 844
Bank book in account with the Manhattan Co 1802-1810
v. 845
Bills payable 1804 July 14-1810 May 23
v. 846
Checkbook, Bank of New York 1805 July 16-1896 November 13
Largely unused.

v. 847
Journal 1799 October 28-1813
v. 847
Thomas Coit, Journal for Savannah 1799 November 5-1802 November 25
v. 848
Ledger, William Coit 1792-1812
v. 848
Thomas Coit 1799 November-1802 May 17
v. 849
Ledger 1834 February 24-1835
v. 849
Farrington & Connell 1840 October 26-1842 June 11
v. 850
Memoranda book (Paris) 1795
v. 851
Memoranda book and diary circa 1798-1804
v. 852
Ledger 1809 February-June
v. 853
Memoranda book 1810 May-1813 June 29
v. 853
Ledger 1810-1812
v. 854
William Coit account with Charles Hewlett 1805 June
(d) Coit and Cochran
v. 855
Accounts current; Coit and Smith 1835 July 29-1837 February 3
v. 856
Bank book 1836 February 3-July 25
v. 857
Bank book 1836 April 27
v. 858
Checkbook 1837 February 10-1838 July 2
v. 859
Letterbook 1835 October 16-1836 January 18
v. 859
Journal 1818 May 1-1823 April 30
v. 860
Sales book 1834 October 20-1836 April 15
(e) Coit and Phillips
v. 861
Accounts current 1802 June 28-1805
v. 862
Bill book 1815-1817
v. 863
Daybook 1802 May 3-1807 May 23
v. 864
Journal 1802 May 3-1806 December 31
v. 864
Stock commission accounts 1829 January 2-June 15
v. 865
Ledger 1802-1805
v. 866
Waste book 1807 May 15-1811 April 30
(f) Coit and Fowler
v. 867
Checkbook 1818 November 9-1819 May 15
(g) Coit and Woolsey
v. 868
Letterbook 1798 August 1-1799 August 9
v. 869
Letterbook 1799 August-1801 June
v. 870
Accounts current 1798 November 19-1802 December 5
v. 871
Cash receipt book 1798 November 8-1801 June 9
v. 872
Journal 1798 August 1-1810 May 31
v. 873
Journal 1800 May 1-1817 October
v. 874
Journal 1811 May 1-1815 December 31
v. 875
Ledger 1798 August-1800 April 29
v. 876
Waste book 1798 August 1-1799 July 31
v. 877
Waste book 1799 August-1802 August
v. 878
Waste book 1800 May 1-1802 March 2
(h) Levi Coit
v. 879
Letterbook 1796-1804
v. 880
Letterbook 1808 January 4-1816 October 15
v. 881
Letterbook 1827-1829
v. 882
Accounts current circa 1824-1835
v. 883
Accounts ledger 1804-1817
v. 884
Bank book 1822-1838
v. 885
Bill book 1818 April 28-1825
v. 886
Cash book 1797-1798
v. 886
Letterbook 1827 February 23-1829 June 24
v. 887
Cash receipt book 1818 July 19-1840 October 3
v. 888
Checkbook 1839 February 6-1840 January 17
v. 889
Exchange and stock commission book 1828 October 24-1829 April
v. 890
Journal 1805 January 7-1806 December 31, 1816 January 2-1817 May 7
v. 891
Journal 1822 April 1-December 7
v. 891
Freight book 1805 February-1816 May
v. 892
Journal 1825 May 31-1827 May 10
v. 892
Cashbook 1831 March-1833 September
v. 892
Coit & Steele, Journal 1828 January-March
v. 893
Journal of Commission Accounts 1820 March 14-1823 April 8, 1831 March-1833 September
Doubloon accounts from 1823.

v. 894
Ledger circa 1796-1802
v. 895
Ledger circa 1805-1816
v. 896
Ledger circa 1805-1826
v. 897
Notes 1825 June 23-1844 October 29
v. 898
Receipt book 1796 November 25-1818 February 13
v. 899
Sales book 1823-1824
v. 900
Stock book 1824 June 21-1834 March 28
v. 901
Stocks 1843 November 11-1844 November 9
v. 902
Waste book 1805 January 7-1807 May 14
v. 903
Waste book 1796 November 24-1802 March
v. 904
Coit & Smith Checkbook 1842 June 21-1843 December 29
v. 905
Thomas Coit Waste book 1799 November 5-1801 November 20
v. 906
William Coit Checkbook 1810 July 23-1812 February 27
(i) Miscellaneous records
v. 907
P. F. Edey 1851
v. 908
Noah Jarvis account book 1824-1832
v. 909
WS & Co. (Wright, Shelby and Co?) Bill book 1839
v. 910
Unidentified ledger 1818-1823
v. 911
Unidentified Checkbook 1921 January 8-1922 June 10
b. 313
William Newton Adams, letters to 1865-1867, 1869, undated
J. H. Brower & Co., letters; records 1858, 1878
Delanoy Safety Log. Co., letters 1900
+ records; photographs.

Farrington Brothers, correspondence 1837-1869
+ records.

b. 314
H. B. Rawson & Co. records; Alfred Searing records
v. 912
Farrington & Cornell day book 1840 October 26-November 1
v. 913
Farrington & Cornell Merchandise receipt stubs 1840 November-1842 May
v. 914
Henry Edey Accounts current 1845-1852
b. 315
MacKay & Dix, Correspondence 1877-1885, undated
b. 316-317
MacKay & Dix unsorted records
v. 915
MacKay & Dix Vessels account book 1881-188?
7. Addenda
Moses Taylor/Moses Taylor and Company
b. 318
Correspondence 1834-1888, undated
b. 318
Letters to and by others 1834-1871
b. 319
Incoming telegrams 1883, 1885, 1887
(too fragile to be served)

b. 320
Letterbooks 1878 January-December 17
b. 321
Letterbooks 1878 December 17-1888
Cable books 1883-1894
b. 322
1883 April 16-1888 December 21
b. 322
Turnure & Co 1892 June 1-November 21
b. 322
Turnure & Co 1893 April 3-July 20
b. 322
Turnure & Co 1893 November 3-1894 February 13
v. 916
Acceptance books 1880-1884
v. 917
Acceptance books 1882 April 13-1884 February 19
Accounts current 1860-1879
v. 918
1860 August 6-1862 October 9
v. 919
1873 November 24-1874 November 7
v. 920
1875
v. 921
1879 April 25-December 31
Account sales 1866-1885
v. 922
1866 July 6-1868 July 22
v. 923
1870 June 27-1873 May 1
v. 924
1873 April 8-1875 March 5
v. 925
1878 February 9-1881 April 13
v. 926
1879 February 9-1883 January 19
v. 927
1883 January 25-1885 June 26
v. 928
Advice book 1873 July 12-1874 December 10
Blotters 1865-1882
v. 929
1865, 1866
v. 930
1878 January-May
v. 931
1880 July 13-1881 March 7
v. 932
1880 May 1-1882 June 20
Cargo books 1876-1888
v. 933
1876 November 4-1878 December 9
v. 934
1878-1880
v. 935
1879
v. 936
1879-1880 December
v. 937
1870s
v. 938
1886 July 31-1888 October 7
v. 939
Cartage book 1852 March 30-1857 June 27
Checkbooks (City Bank) 1837-1859
v. 940
1837 December 12-1838 October 24
v. 941
1838 October 25-1839 March 13
v. 942
1839 March 15-October 8
v. 943
1839 October 8-1840 May 30
v. 944
1840 June 1-1841 March
v. 945
1841 April October
v. 946
1841 November-1842 June
v. 947
1844 August 1-1845 April 17
v. 948
1844 April 18-1846 January 5
v. 949
1846 January 6-August 28
v. 950
1846 August 28-1847 April 30
v. 951
1847 May 1-October 16
v. 952
1847 October 16-1848 May 11
v. 953
1848 May 12-October 10
v. 954
1848 October 11-1849 May 17
v. 955
1849 May 17-October
v. 956
1849 November 1-1850 May 11
v. 957
1850 July 1-1851 January 31
v. 958
1851 February 1-September 1
v. 959
1851 September 2-1852 March 16
v. 960
1852 September 24-1853 May 13
v. 961
1853 May 13-November 30
v. 962
1853 December-1853 June 30
v. 963
1854 July-November 29
v. 964
1854 December 1-1855 April 25
v. 965
1855 April 26-August 31
v. 966
1855 September 1-1856 January 26
v. 967
1856 January 26-June 30
v. 968
1856 June 30-November 29
v. 969
1856 December 1-1857 April 30
v. 970
1857 May 1-October 16
v. 971
1857 October 17-1858 March 12
v. 972
1858 March 13-October 25
v. 973
1858 October 26-1859 June 21
v. 974
1859 November 25-1860 April 24
Day books (National City Bank) 1862-1888
v. 975
1862 May 21-October 31
v. 976
1862 November 1-1863 April 7
v. 977
1863 October 23-1864 May 23
v. 978
1864 May 23-December 5
v. 979
1864 December 5-1865 July
v. 980
1866 January 2-July 20
v. 981
1867 August 2-1868 February 24
v. 982
1867 March 16-July 31
v. 983
1867 August 1-December 21
v. 984
1876 December 22-1877 May 12
v. 985
1877 May 12-September 29
v. 986
1877 September 29-1878 January 26
v. 987
1878 May 20-September 12
v. 988
1878 September 12-December 26
v. 989
1878 December 27-1879 May 6
v. 990
1879 May 6-October 25
v. 991
1879 January 3-June 13
v. 992
1879 June 13-November 5
v. 993
1879 November 5-1880 April 12
v. 994
1880 April 12-September 10
v. 995
1880 April 13-August 21
v. 996
1880 August 24-1881 February 1
v. 997
1880 September 10-1881 January 3
v. 998
1881 January 5-May 16
v. 999
1881 February 1-June 14
v. 1000
1881 June 16-September 22
v. 1001
1881 July 22-November 25
v. 1002
1881 September 24-1881 February 2
v. 1003
1881 November 28-1882 April 14
v. 1004
1882 February 4-June
v. 1005
1882 April 17-July 21
v. 1006
1882 June 3-September 19
v. 1007
1882 July 20-November 1
v. 1008
1883 August 2-December 29
v. 1009
1885 March 26-August 27
v. 1010
1885 March 26-August 27
v. 1011
1884 August 21-1886 February 3
v. 1012
1885 August 29-1886 January 9
v. 1013
1886 January 12-June 3
v. 1014
1886 June 5-October 12
v. 1015
1886 July 14-November 15
v. 1016
1888 January 3-June 26
v. 1017
1888 February 24-July 2
v. 1018
Account book (City Bank?) 1863 April 7-October 22
v. 1019
Account book (City bank?) 1856 December 27-1860 July 12
v. 1020
Cash book 1867 January 14-August 1
v. 1021
Cash book 1868 February 24-August 31
v. 1022
Blotter (City Bank) 1860 April 25-September 14
v. 1023
Blotter, (City Bank) 1860 September 15-1861 February 20
v. 1024
Blotter 1865 March 24-1867 October 3
v. 1025
Blotter 1867 October 3-1869 July 6
v. 323-325
Various deposit books, City Bank
v. 1026
Expenses book 1865 July 5-December 30
v. 1027
Account book (City Bank) 1861 November 19-1869 July 6
v. 1028
Checks, City Bank 1859 June 22-November 23
v. 1029
Checks, National Bank of New York 1848 December 2-1852 March 15
v. 1030
Checks, National Bank of New York 1850 April 9-1852 August 19
v. 1031
Checks, Mechanics Bank 1844 May 25-1846 April 13
v. 1032
Checks, Bank of America 1851 June 2-1853 September 9
v. 1033
Deposit book, Bank of North America 1851 May 5-1853 December 21
v. 1034
Deposit book, Bank of Commonwealth 1853 September 15-1856 September 14
v. 1035
Collection book, North River Bank 1852 May 27-1855 July 9
v. 326
Check books, State Bank of New York 1846-1853
v. 1036
Cargo manifests, Canton, China 1837
v. 1037
Collection book, bonds & mortgages 1860s
v. 1038
Cooperage book 1868 January 9-1873 January 22
v. 1039
Cooperage book 1882 February 27-1884 May 24
Customs House memoranda books 1864-1878
v. 1040
1864
v. 1041
1865
v. 1042
1867
v. 1043
1868
v. 1044
1869
v. 1045
1874-1875
v. 1046
1875
v. 1047
1878
v. 1048
Collection book 1847 September 10-1850 December
v. 1048a
Exchanges 1880 January 2-1885 July 6
v. 1049
Exchanges 1885 July 6-1888 April 10
v. 1050
Exchanges 1886 November 4-1887 April
v. 1051
Invoices inward 1872-1874
v. 1052
Invoices inward 1874-1876
v. 1053
Invoices inward 1880-1883
v. 1054
Labor list 1863 October 17-1869 August 7
v. 1055
Labor list 1869 August 14-1876 February 19
v. 1056
Labor list 1876 March 4-1882 November 25
v. 1057
Ledger (credits on Europe) 1865-1870
v. 1058
Note ledger 1877-1881
v. 1059
Notes for collection 1884 February 29-1886 July 23
v. 1060
Petty cash 1854 January 3-1858 September 1
Postage 1838-1884
v. 1061
1838 January-April 15
v. 1062
1844 January-1845 March 29
v. 1063
1849 October 3-1851 January 14
v. 1064
1851 January 31-1857 August 25
v. 1065
1856 August 9-1857 December 7
v. 1066
1865 August 25-1870 January 19
v. 1067
1870 January 17-1872 September 11
v. 1068
1872 September 12-1873 October 31
v. 1069
1875 August 18-1880 October
v. 1070
1877 December 3-1878 June 29
v. 1071
1881 February-1884
v. 1072
Receipt book 1838 August 15-1841 April 24
v. 1073
Receipt book ???? November-1860 August 22
v. 1074
Remittance book 1877 October 2-1878
v. 1075
Remittance book 1878 June 5-1879
v. 1076
Order book 1867-1870
v. 1077
Order book 1872 November 1-1875
Sales books 1863-1888
v. 1078
1863 July 7-1864 July 20
v. 1079
1864 July 19-1865 September 14
v. 1080
1866 January 8-1868 April 16
v. 1081
1866 August 29-1867 August 12
v. 1082
1869 April 9-1872 December
v. 1083
Cotton 1871 March 23-1885 August 15
v. 1084
1875 May 10-1878 August 29
v. 1085
1875 October 5-1879 March 18
v. 1086
1883 February 27-1885 May 29
v. 1087
1885 May-1888 December 3
v. 1088
1886 August 21-1888 November 28
v. 1089
Stock purchases 1836 March 1-1847 December 30
v. 1090
Securities 1867-1869
v. 1091
Securities 1870-1876
v. 1092
Securities 1875 November 5-1880 April 13
v. 1093
Securities 1880 April 14-1886 December 31
v. 1094
Bonds & mortgages 1856
v. 1095
U. S. called bonds book 1870s
v. 1096
Sundries 1881 March 8-September 9
v. 1097
Sundries 1869 October 15-1870 May 19
v. 1098
Sundries 1885 November 27-1886 September 10
Ticklers
v. 1099
1860
v. 1100
1861
v. 1101
1862
v. 1102
1867
v. 1103
1868
v. 1104
1873
v. 1105
1879
v. 1106
1886
v. 1107
Vessel & cargo insurance book 1886 January 28-1887 November 3
v. 1108
Vessels accounts 1840 August 1-1844 October 23
v. 1109
Order book 1882 December 4-1888 December 15
v. 1110
Order book 1880s
v. 1111
Checkbook 1853 September 15-1855 March 2
Papers of business partners and associates
v. 1112
Percy Pyne Letterbook 1868 June 19-1871 January 4
v. 1113
Percy Pyne Letterbook 1871 January 5-1874 December 21
v. 1114
Lawrence Turnure Commissions book 1890 July 1-1891 June 30
v. 1115
Charles Heckscher Bank book 1861 March 20-1865 January 5
Records of Industrial Companies
v. 1116
Cayuga & Susquehanna Railroad bank book (City Bank) 1857 September 15-1858 May 20
v. 1117
Chestnut Hill Iron Ore Co. Check book of Stephen Palmer, Receiver (National City Bank) 1898 February 1-1900 August 27
Union Iron & Coal Co. (Phoenix Iron & Coal Co)
v. 1118
Interest coupons on bonds 1855 February 1-1857 August 1
v. 1119
Industrial stock records 1863 October 1-1865 April 1
v. 1120
Securities receipt book (industrial) 1887 January 4-1889 January 2
v. 1122
Bond book
v. 1123
Industrial stocks
Other merchants
Levi Coit
Check books (City Bank) 1828-1835
v. 1124
1828 March 30-1830 February 9
v. 1125
1830 February 9-June 9
v. 1126
1830 June 9-1831 January 7
v. 1127
1831 January 7-August 2
v. 1128
1831 August 3-1832 March 19
v. 1129
1832 March 20-September 24
v. 1130
1832 September 25-1833 January 25
v. 1131
1833 January 26-June 6
v. 1132
1833 June 6-October 8
v. 1133
1833 October 9-1834 February 27
v. 1134
1834 February 28-August 15
v. 1135
1834 August 15-1825 January 6
v. 1136
1835 January 7-May 8
v. 1137
1835 May 9-October 7
v. 1138
1835 October 8-1836 March 7
v. 1139
Bill book (credit & debit) 1804-1813
Unidentified
v. 1140
Union checks 1833 March 29-1836 November 7
v. 1141
Union checks 1836 November 9-1837 February 8
v. 1142
Check book (Merchants' Exchange Bank) 1846 July 29-1847 February 26
v. 1143
Check book (City Bank) 1858 April 26-1867 February 5
v. 1144
Check book (Corn Exchange Bank) 1860 August 15-1861 July 23
v. 1145
Check book (Sussex National Bank) 1896 March 1-July 6
v. 1146
Receipt book (Carnegie Steel Co) 1900 February 23-October 6
v. 1147
Cash book 1904 January 1-1906 December 31
v. 1148
Discount tickler 1905 May 1-September
v. 1149
Account sales 1868 May 9-1870 October 6
v. 1150
Invoices inward 1878 July 6-1880 July 23
v. 1151
Sales book 1861 August 23-1863 November 10
v. 1152
Accounts book 1879 October-1880 April
v. 1153
Collection tickler (Lawrence Turnure & Co.?) 1903
v. 1154-1166
(boxed) Sugar accounts
v. 1167
Sugar accounts 1861-1863
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