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Executive in 500ft Canary Wharf death leap was in turmoil after split from girlfriend: He used bolt cutters to reach the roof
'Brilliant' Gabriel Magee had repeatedly tried to get on Canary Wharf roof
In January he broke through hatch and jumped as workers arrived
Ex-girlfriend spoke of his interest in students who died in a suicide pact
'That was something Gabe thought about a lot', she told his inquest
Coroner records suicide verdict driven by mental illness
Father accused firm of 'murder by omission' for failing to stop him
JP Morgan head of investigations said it is 'a place of work, not a prison'
By MARTIN ROBINSON and MARIO LEDWITH FOR THE DAILY MAIL
PUBLISHED: 10:25 EST, 20 May 2014 | UPDATED: 04:47 EST, 21 May 2014

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A JP Morgan executive leapt to his death from the bank’s European headquarters in London after using bolt cutters to break out on to the roof, an inquest heard.
Gabriel Magee fell 500ft to his death as horrified workers arrived at the building in Canary Wharf.
A day earlier the ‘brilliant’ IT executive had written ‘jump’ on his computer.
Angry: His father Bill Magee spoke outside court to accuse the firm of 'murder by omission'
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Evidence: Lucy Pinches said her ex-boyfriend was fascinated by parallel universes and an American couple who hoped if they killed themselves they would wake in one
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Gabriel's father Bill Magee (left) accused JP Morgan of 'murder by omission' after the inquest. In court, Lucy Pinches (right) said her ex-boyfriend was fascinated by parallel universes and a couple who had a suicide pact
Poplar Coroner's Court heard Mr Magee had a 'dark side' and was repeatedly captured on CCTV trying to get onto the roof of the tower block in the weeks before his death.
After the breakdown of a long-term relationship, Mr Magee had developed an obsession with a bizarre suicide pact involving two students.
In the months leading up to his death he had tried to access the 33-storey building’s roof on several occasions.
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Security bosses at the bank said it had been discovered that he had been on a number of reconnaissance missions to the bank’s upper floors.
Following his death, investigators also unearthed notes on his computer expressing self-hatred and reminding himself to ‘try to jump off the building’.
Mr Magee’s father accused the bank of ‘negligence’ and ‘murder by omission’ last night, suggesting that ‘something more sinister’ was behind his son’s death.
CCTV footage showed Mr Magee, who had worked at the bank for 10 years, climbing on to the roof on the night of January 27.
Before he jumped he sent his girlfriend Veronica Strande several text messages while he sat drinking tequila on the roof of the building, the inquest heard.
His ex-girlfriend Lucy Pinches said today Mr Magee had an obsession with the concept of parallel universes and a suicide pact of two U.S. students.
'There was a story of a double suicide in the States where two students had killed themselves, she said.
'It was to do with quantum physics and suicide, the two students were linked up to lethal injections which were operated by lottery numbers.
'So the only universe they would wake up in would be the one they both won the lottery in.
'That was something Gabe thought about a lot and had the mental capacity to think about it a lot, with the equations and the physics.'
Tragedy: IT executive Gabriel Magee was found dead at the end of January after jumping from the top of JP Morgan's headquarters in Canary Wharf, London, and landing on a surrounding roof
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Tragedy: IT executive Gabriel Magee was found dead at the end of January after jumping from the top of JP Morgan's headquarters in Canary Wharf, London, and landing on a surrounding roof
The couple had split up in late 2012 after an on-off four-year relationship, which began to break down after his behaviour became more and more unusual.
She continued: 'He was a very unique person, he was incredibly intelligent, he had a brilliant mind, he was very kind and affectionate, he was creative, he had a sense of adventure, he liked trying new things.
'But he did have a darker side to him that I found was always there.
'I always felt he suffered from some kind of depression and at various stages it was worse, some times it was better, but he had a darkness that was linked to his creativity.'
Mr Magee leapt from the top floor of the tower at around 8am on January 28 and had fallen 24 floors onto a ninth storey roof, which surrounds the base of the bank's European Headquarters.
A therapist who treated Mr Magee over ten months in 2012 said she had no reason to suspect that he was at high risk of committing suicide.
However security logs from his key card and CCTV footage showed him carrying out reconnaissance to get onto the roof of the building in the months before he jumped.
JP Morgan investigator Jonathan Shatford told the court that he was also seen on external cameras standing outside the building looking at the roof.
Access to the top floor of the holding is limited to an alarmed fire exit and an access hatch with a padlock, which had been removed when police arrived on the scene.
Tragedy: Mr Magee's girlfriend Veronica Strande, pictured with his father Bill Magee, received several text messages before he killed himself
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Tragedy: Mr Magee's girlfriend Veronica Strande, pictured with his father Bill Magee, received several text messages before he killed himself
On two occasions Mr Magee was seen climbing a steel step ladder into the hatch, after attempting to swipe out of the fire exit with his staff ID card.
He was last seen on CCTV at 20.11 moving around on top of the roof. When police and Mr Shatford went to investigate they found a pair of bolt cutters, a mobile phone and tablet beside an empty bottle of tequila.
Mr Magee, known as 'Gabe' to friends, had lived in the UK since 2007.
He had spent nearly a decade at the firm, where he specialised in cutting-edge software that makes huge profits by predicting patterns in the market.
However a colleague told his inquest that his job was 'low-stress' and had seemed 'extremely happy' in the days before his death.
Manager Andrew Harling said that Mr Magee had acted 'out of character' on three occasions in the year before his suicide.
Close friend and colleague Mark Gibbons was given the grim task of gathering Mr Magee's belongings together.
He said: 'As part of the process of getting his personal effects together we spent quite a long time going through his desk.
Family: Mr Magee's sister Daniela was also at the inquest where a verdict of suicide was recorded
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Family: Mr Magee's sister Daniela was also at the inquest where a verdict of suicide was recorded
'There was nothing on there particularly untoward about suicide or the building itself. There was a map of Canary Wharf, but there was nothing to indicate that he had actively done any reconnaissance on the building to find an area.'
But Mr Gibbons said his friend was having 'some very unusual thoughts and confided with me about them.
'He thought Lucy was maybe a witch.'
Mr Magee's father, Bill, had travelled to the UK with sister, Gabriela, to hear details of the time leading to his death.
According to his current girlfriend Veronica Strande Mr Magee had emailed her the evening before his death saying he was 'running late'.
She told the inquest he had never talked about taking his own life. She said: 'On the Sunday before it happened we had hours of conversation about our future and what we wanted. I know that he was very happy with his work arrangements.
'He had just made his citizenship application and we had spoken about where we wanted to live together. With British citizenship we could go an move to somewhere in Europe.
'There was nothing mentioned about being upset with anything. He was looking forward to the future, what we wanted, what we wanted to see, what we wanted to do and what we wanted to achieve.'
Recording death by suicide Senior Coroner Mary Hassell said that Mr Magee's battle with psychological illness would have led to struggle at work, rather than work stress being a driver behind the death.
Gabriel's father Bill Magee refused to accept the suicide verdict, accusing JP Morgan of 'murder by omission'.
He demanded to know why JP Morgan security staff did not stop his son accessing the roof.
Speaking outside the court, he said: 'Why wasn't he stopped?
'The security features in place - cameras and entry alarms - should have alerted security and they should have taken responsibility for keeping any JP Morgan employee from accessing the roof of the JP Morgan building.
'This negligence on the part of JP Morgan cost my son his life. That negligence killed my son.'
The inquest heard that Mr Magee accessed security the top floors of the building via a fire escape, according to his security pass logs.
However, his movements were not analysed because his pass allowed him into those areas from his office on the ninth floor.
Checks of the pass and CCTV after his death showed he made several visits to the top level of the building, once in November 2013 and once in January, days before he died.
Mr Magee, speaking after the inquest, said: 'I don't want to accept that [verdict].
'He drank enough tequila that whenever he fell he may have been looking to say "have I got the guts to do this" and fell. He could have fallen.'
In shock: A JP Morgan worker looks out of his window as Mr Magee's body was recovered in January, but it emerged today he had made several attempts to get on the roof before his death
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In shock: A JP Morgan worker looks out of his window as Mr Magee's body was recovered in January, but it emerged today he had made several attempts to get on the roof before his death
The man was found on the 9th floor of the bank's European headquarters building
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People look out of the window of the J P Morgan building at Canary Wharf
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Roof death: Workers at Canary Wharf said hundreds were looking at the man's body from their windows
He added: 'Gabriel, our son, was crushed by that fall, as were the hearts of his brother and sisters and his mother and I.'
In the inquest Mr Magee asked Jonathan Shatford, JP Morgan's head of investigations, how his son had been able to access the roof.
Mr Shatford replied that their security was focused on preventing unauthorised people getting in rather than people breaking out.
Mr Shatford said: 'JP Morgan is not a prison, it is a place of work.'
He said Gabriel Magee had cut open a lock on a hatch on the fire escape, which was next to an alarmed door which would have alerted security if he had tried to open it.
Bolt cutters and the broken lock were found on the roof.
In her summing up, Mrs Hassell agreed with Mr Shatford, and concluded Gabriel Magee had carried out a 'considered act'.
She added: 'JP Morgan have of course a duty of care to their employees and a duty to keep them as safe as possible.
'But there has to be a balance that is struck between the safety of employees and... not imprisoning the employees.
'If there had been a fire and any escape route had been blocked we would be here asking why that was.'
A spokesman for JP Morgan said: 'Our heartfelt condolences go out to Gabriel’s family and friends. We are focused on supporting our colleagues and those close to him on this very difficult day.'
For confidential support call the Samaritans in the UK on 08457 90 90 90, visit a local Samaritans branch or click here for details


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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2633973/U-S-IT-worker-obsessed-idea-committing-suicide-lead-waking-parallel-universe-jumped-death-JP-Morgans-500ft-London-HQ.html

 

 

 

Suspicious Death of JPMorgan Vice President, Gabriel Magee, Under Investigation in London

By Pam Martens: February 9, 2014


(Left) JPMorgan's European Headquarters at 25 Bank Street, in the Canary Wharf Section of London
London Police have confirmed that an official investigation is underway into the death of a 39-year old JPMorgan Vice President whose body was found on the 9th floor rooftop of a JPMorgan building in Canary Wharf two weeks ago.

The news reports at the time of the incident of Gabriel (Gabe) Magee’s “non suspicious” death by “suicide” resulting from his reported leap from the 33rd level rooftop of JPMorgan’s European headquarters building in London have turned out to be every bit as reliable as CEO Jamie Dimon’s initial response to press reports on the London Whale trading scandal in 2012 as a “tempest in a teapot.”

An intense investigation is now underway into the details of exactly how Magee died and why his death was so quickly labeled “non suspicious.” An upcoming Coroner’s inquest will reveal the details of that investigation.

It’s becoming clear that when JPMorgan tells us “nothing to see here, move along,” that’s the precise time we need to bring in the blood hounds and law enforcement with the guts to get past this global behemoth’s army of lawyers who have a penchant for taking over investigations and producing their own milquetoast reports of what happened.

Jamie Dimon’s so-called “tempest in a teapot” in the London Whale matter morphed into $6.2 billion in bank depositor losses, $1 billion in fines to JPMorgan, 300 pages of scandalous details by the U.S. Senate’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations that called into question JPMorgan’s risk controls and the integrity of upper management, and, finally, resulted in criminal charges against two of the men involved. The criminal cases have yet to go to trial.

According to numerous sources close to the investigation of Gabriel Magee’s death, almost nothing thus far reported about his death has been accurate. This appears to stem from an initial poorly worded press release issued by the Metropolitan Police in London which may have been a result of bad communications between it and JPMorgan or something more deliberate on someone’s part.

The Metropolitan Police have provided me with their original press release. It reads:

“Police were called at approximately 08.02 hrs on Tuesday 28 January to reports of a man having fallen from a building at 25 Bank Street, E14 and landing on a ninth floor roof. London Ambulance Service and London Air Ambulance attended. The man was pronounced dead at the scene a short while later. The deceased is believed to be aged 39. We believe we know the identity of the deceased but await formal identification. Next of kin have been informed. No arrests have been made and the death is being treated as non-suspicious.”

That press release resulted in CNBC running with this headline: “Death Plunge at JP Morgan Tower Not Suspicious, Police Say.” Dozens of other media followed with similar reporting.

The Independent newspaper in London flatly stated that Magee “died after falling from the roof.” The London Evening Standard tweeted: “Bankers watch JP Morgan IT exec fall to his death from roof of London HQ,” which linked to their article which declared in its opening sentence that “A man plunged to his death from a Canary Wharf tower in front of thousands of horrified commuters today.”

At this moment in time, police have yet to produce a single witness who saw Magee jump from the rooftop of this building, let alone “thousands of horrified commuters.” (Exactly why would thousands of horrified commuters be standing in front of 25 Bank Street at 8:02 a.m. with their necks tilted up toward the roof? Magee did not land on the sidewalk; his body was found on a rooftop 9 floors above street level.) Both the Independent and London Evening Standard newspapers are majority owned by Alexander Lebedev, a Russian and former KGB agent.

No one in the media seemed to notice that Iain Dey, Deputy Business Editor of the Sunday Times in London, flatly disputed the notion that a plunge from the rooftop had been observed by anyone when he reported that: “Gabriel Magee’s body lay for several hours before it was found at 8am last Tuesday.”

The only facts in this case which are currently reliable are that fellow workers looking from their windows in the building noticed a body lying on the 9th level rooftop, which juts out from the main 33-story building, at around 8:02 a.m. on Tuesday, January 28, and called the police. There is no concrete proof at this moment in time that Magee fell, jumped or was ever on the 33-story rooftop, which is a highly secured area of the building unobtainable by employees other than top security and maintenance personnel. According to design documents that have been publicly filed, the rooftop functions as a highly sophisticated cooling plant with large, bulky machinery taking up the majority of the space on the side of the building from which Magee would have had to jump in order to land on the 9th level rooftop.

No solid evidence exists currently to suggest that the death was a suicide. In fact, there is a strong piece of evidence pointing in the opposite direction. Magee had emailed his girlfriend, Veronica, on the evening of January 27 to say that he was about to leave the office and would see her shortly. She received no further emails from him, suggesting that whatever happened to Magee happened shortly thereafter, not the next morning. According to multiple sources, Magee’s girlfriend reported his disappearance on the evening of January 27. The Metropolitan Police would provide me with no details on that investigation.

The JPMorgan building at 25 Bank Street is located in the borough of Tower Hamlets. According to drawings and plans submitted by JPMorgan to the borough after it purchased the building for £495 million in 2010, the 9th floor roof is accessible “via the stair from level 8 within the existing Level 9 plant enclosure…” In other words, it would be just as reasonable to entertain the possibility that Magee suffered his physical injuries inside the building and his body was placed on the 9th level rooftop via an internal staircase access sometime during the night of January 27.

The LinkedIn profile that Magee set up for himself online indicates that he was involved with “Technical architecture oversight for planning, development, and operation of systems for fixed income securities and interest rate derivatives.” As a key part of the computer technology group in London, Magee may have been involved in providing subpoenaed material for the London Whale investigation and the myriad other investigations that JPMorgan has been sanctioned and fined for over the last year. There are two serious open investigations into foreign exchange rigging and potential manipulation of commodities markets.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) lists the man known as the London Whale, Bruno Iksil, who is cooperating with criminal prosecutors, and the two traders who have been criminally charged with hiding hundreds of millions of dollars in losses, Javier Martin-Artajo and Julien Grout, as having the same JPMorgan address, 25 Bank Street, as did Gabriel Magee.

Documents produced by the U.S. Senate’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, however, show a 2012 address for JPMorgan’s Chief Investment Office in London, supposedly where the London Whale trades were originating, as 100 Wood Street, 6th Floor, London. If the London Whale traders were located at an address other than the European Headquarters for JPMorgan, it could have been to evade detection by regulators that the firm was using bank deposits in the United States, that carried FDIC insurance, to place high risk gambles in London in the derivatives market.

The Senate’s 300-page report noted that key traders involved in the London Whale matter, including Iksil, Martin-Artajo, and Grout, refused to submit to interviews by the Senate investigators. The Senate report notes that “their refusal to provide information to the Subcommittee meant that this Report had to be prepared without their direct input. The Subcommittee relied instead on their internal emails, recorded telephone conversations and instant messages, internal memoranda and presentations, and interview summaries prepared by the bank’s internal investigation, to reconstruct what happened.”

If Magee became aware that incriminating emails, instant messages, or video teleconferences were not turned over in their entirety to Senate investigators or Justice Department prosecutors, that might be reason enough for his untimely death. Yes, this is speculation. But it is along the lines that smart thinking investigators need to intensely explore to bring peace of mind and answers to Gabriel Magee’s loved ones and coworkers.

http://wallstreetonparade.com/2014/02/suspicious-death-of-jpmorgan-vice-president-gabriel-magee-under-investigation-in-london/

 

 

January 28, 2014
DECEASED: Gabriel Magee, 39, a JP Morgan employee, died after reportedly “falling” from the roof of its European headquarters in London in the Canary Wharf area. Magee was vice president at JPMorgan Chase & Co’s (JPM) London headquarters.
Gabriel Magee, a Vice President at JPMorgan in London, plunged to his death from the roof of the 33-story European headquarters of JPMorgan in Canary Wharf. Magee was involved in “Technical architecture oversight for planning, development, and operation of systems for fixed income securities and interest rate derivatives” based on his online Linkedin profile.
It’s important to note that JPMorgan, like Deutsche Bank, is under investigation for its potential involvement in rigging foreign exchange rates. JPMorgan is also reportedly under investigation by the same U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations for its alleged involvement in rigging the physical commodities markets in the U.S. and London.
Regarding the initial reports of his death, journalist Pam Martens of Wall Street on Paradeastutely exposed the controlled, scripted details of the media accounts surrounding Magee’s death in an article written on February 9, 2014. Ms. Martens writes:
“According to numerous sources close to the investigation of Gabriel Magee’s death, almost nothing thus far reported about his death has been accurate. This appears to stem from an initial poorly worded press release issued by the Metropolitan Police in London which may have been a result of bad communications between it and JPMorgan or something more deliberate on someone’s part.” [Emphasis added].
Ms. Martens also notes:
No solid evidence exists currently to suggest that the death was a suicide. In fact, there is a strong piece of evidence pointing in the opposite direction. Magee had emailed his girlfriend, Veronica, on the evening of January 27 to say that he was about to leave the office and would see her shortly. [Emphasis added].
Based on information she developed, it appears likely that Magee did not meet his fate on the morning his body was discovered, but hours earlier. Considering the possibility that Magee might now have died in the manner publicized, Ms. Martens offers speculation, and notes it as such:
If Magee became aware that incriminating emails, instant messages, or video teleconferences were not turned over in their entirety to Senate investigators or Justice Department prosecutors, that might be reason enough for his untimely death.
Looking at the death of Magee in the context of a larger conspiracy, it is difficult not to suspect foul play and media manipulation

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 The Inquest of JPMorgan VP Gabriel Magee: Case Closed; Move Along
By Pam Martens and Russ Martens: May 20, 2014


Jonathan Shatford, Former Member of Metropolitan Police in London, Headed the Internal Investigation for JPMorgan Into the Death of Gabriel Magee
If it’s at all possible, don’t die on the premises of a too-big-to-fail bank like JPMorgan. That’s because if you do your otherwise meritorious life and career is likely to be turned into a circus of slanderous tidbits in order to promote the reputation of the global banking behemoth as the benevolent guardian of all things noble and saintly.

A coroner’s inquest began at 10 a.m. in London this morning to investigate how 39 year old Gabriel Magee, a technology Vice President who worked in JPMorgan’s European headquarters at 25 Bank Street in London, came to be found dead on a 9th level rooftop at approximately 8:02 a.m. on the morning of January 28 of this year.

The inquest had barely begun when the wire service, Reuters, ran this headline: “JP Morgan Executive Had High Alcohol Level Before Skyscraper Plunge, London Inquest Hears.” That’s called framing the story. Within the next hour, newspapers around the globe who had no reporter at the inquest to do first hand reporting, were running with the Reuters headline and abbreviated story.

Next up was a seriously specious headline from the UK Mirror newspaper. The headline that ran in bold black type at the newspaper’s web site declared that “A JP Morgan Bank Vice-President Said He ‘Couldn’t Handle This’ Before Falling Canary Wharf Tower Block.” (The word “Off” seems to be missing from the headline as well as any semblance of truthful reporting.)

The Mirror headline neglects to explain that those words were uttered at least six years prior to Gabriel Magee’s death, when he was working for JPMorgan in New York – words that 90 percent of computer programmers have likely uttered at some point in their career; sometimes a dozen times a day. (That JPMorgan investigators were forced to dig out this ancient nugget and present it at the inquest shows just how little they had to go on to make this suicide story stick.)

The Mirror also ferreted out a tidbit from an ex-girlfriend, reporting: “She added that Magee had had thoughts about life in another universe that she did not understand and that he had continually refused help from those close to him.” The idea of “life in another universe” is shared by the majority of 2.18 billion people, otherwise known as Christians, who believe in life after death and heaven. Typically, they are not urged to get “help” for those beliefs.

The cold hard facts on the ground are these: Gabriel Magee was in a loving relationship with a beautiful young attorney, Veronica Strande. They were happily living together. Ms. Strande testified at the inquest that “there was no problem.” Sources close to both of them say that Magee had brought Strande to the U.S. to meet his parents and was very happy in the relationship.

As far as being a kook as portrayed by the ex-girlfriend, Magee’s own career nullifies that assertion. He had worked for JPMorgan in one of the most demanding of technology jobs for more than a decade. He has received promotions and bonuses and risen to the rank of Vice President. He was a key player in one of the most important areas of technology at the company. According to his LinkedIn profile, he was currently engaged in “Technical architecture oversight for planning, development, and operation of systems for fixed income securities and interest rate derivatives.”

A former colleague told Wall Street On Parade that Magee “focused extensively on Java and Sybase databases. He also did C++ and many other UNIX related languages.”

In fact, Magee’s career history was staid and stable compared to the history of his firm which has been charged by regulators with an endless series of crimes over the past 18 months, including lying to Congress, facilitating the Madoff fraud (two suspended felony counts for that one and two years of probation), rigging electric markets in California and the Midwest, fraudulently selling mortgages, losing $6.2 billion of bank depositors’ money in a crazy derivatives scheme (London Whale), rigging Libor interest rates and on and on.

The bank’s reputation under its current CEO and Chairman, Jamie Dimon, was summed up thusly by Senator Carl Levin: The bank “piled on risk, hid losses, disregarded risk limits, manipulated risk models, dodged oversight, and misinformed the public.” (See our series here for an in depth look at the culture of this firm.)

The sensational reporting of news from Gabriel Magee’s inquest this morning was matched only by the outrageous and unprecedented reporting on the morning his body was discovered on January 28 of this year.

The Independent newspaper in London flatly stated that Magee “died after falling from the roof.” The London Evening Standard tweeted: “Bankers watch JP Morgan IT exec fall to his death from roof of London HQ,” which linked to their article which declared in its opening sentence that “A man plunged to his death from a Canary Wharf tower in front of thousands of horrified commuters today.”

The only person who seemed to give a whit about reporting this story honestly was Iain Dey, Deputy Business Editor of the Sunday Times in London, who flatly disputed the notion that a plunge from the rooftop had been observed by anyone when he reported that: “Gabriel Magee’s body lay for several hours before it was found at 8am last Tuesday.”

Lost in this morning’s sensational headlines was the very disturbing detail that out of those “thousands of horrified commuters” and the “bankers” reported to have seen Magee fall, not one eye witness has been produced by the police to this alleged jump from the top of JPMorgan’s offices at 25 Bank Street.

As it turns out, an ole pal of the Scotland Yard was put in charge of the internal JPMorgan investigation. Jonathan Shatford is a former Metropolitan Police officer from New Scotland Yard and a career detective who rose to the rank of Detective Chief Superintendent over 32 years. Shatford previously worked for Bear Stearns, which collapsed during 2008 and was taken over by JPMorgan. Shatford is responsible for JPMorgan investigations in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

As if there had been any doubt from the beginning as to the outcome of this inquest, the coroner, Mary Hassell, ruled at the end of the proceeding that “I am wholly satisfied that Gabriel jumped off the 32nd floor with the intention of killing himself.”

Case closed. Nothing to see here. Move along.

http://wallstreetonparade.com/2014/05/the-inquest-of-jpmorgan-vp-gabriel-magee-case-closed-move-along/

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