Alfred Herrhausen

 

content Timeline Snakes in Banking

Alfred Herrhausen
German banker
Alfred Herrhausen was a German banker and the Chairman of Deutsche Bank, who was assassinated in 1989. He was a member of the Steering Committee of the Bilderberg Group and from 1971 onwards a member of Deutsche Bank's Management Board. Wikipedia
Born: January 30, 1930, Essen, Germany
Assassinated: November 30, 1989, Bad Homburg, Germany
Place of burial: Waldfriedhof, Bad Homburg, Germany
Spouse: Traudl Herrhausen (m. 1977–1989), Ulla Sattler (m. 1953–1977)
Children: Anna Katharina Herrhausen, Bettina Herrhausen
Parents: Wilhelmine Herrhausen, Karl Herrhausen

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<SEC-DOCUMENT>0000950168-99-003168.txt : 19991221
<SEC-HEADER>0000950168-99-003168.hdr.sgml : 19991221
ACCESSION NUMBER: 0000950168-99-003168
CONFORMED SUBMISSION TYPE: 497
PUBLIC DOCUMENT COUNT: 1
FILED AS OF DATE: 19991220

FILER:

COMPANY DATA:
COMPANY CONFORMED NAME: DEUTSCHE ASSET MANAGEMENT
CENTRAL INDEX KEY: 0000912035
STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION: []
STATE OF INCORPORATION: NY
FISCAL YEAR END: 1031

FILING VALUES:
FORM TYPE: 497
SEC ACT:
SEC FILE NUMBER: 033-68704
FILM NUMBER: 99777287

BUSINESS ADDRESS:
STREET 1: 150 SOUTH INDEPENDENCE SQUARE WEST STE 7
CITY: PHILADELPHIA
STATE: PA
ZIP: 19106

MAIL ADDRESS:
STREET 1: 150 S INDEPENDENCE SQUARE STE 726
CITY: PHILADLEPHIA
STATE: PA
ZIP: 19106

FORMER COMPANY:
FORMER CONFORMED NAME: MORGAN GRENFELL INVESTMENT TRUST
DATE OF NAME CHANGE: 19930915
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<TYPE>497
<SEQUENCE>1
<DESCRIPTION>MORGAN GRENFELL INVESTMENT TRUST
<TEXT>



MORGAN GRENFELL INVESTMENT TRUST
INSTITUTIONAL AND SERVICE SHARES
Fixed Income Fund, Short-Term Fixed Income Fund, Municipal Bond Fund, Short-Term
Municipal Bond Fund, Total Return Bond Fund, High Yield Bond Fund, Smaller
Companies Fund, Microcap Fund, Large Cap Growth Fund

SUPPLEMENT DATED DECEMBER 17, 1999 (REPLACING SUPPLEMENT DATED OCTOBER 20, 1999)
TO PROSPECTUSES DATED MARCH 1, 1999

THE FOLLOWING REVISES MORGAN GRENFELL INVESTMENT TRUST'S ADDRESS FOR ALL
CORRESPONDENCE, INCLUDING APPLICATIONS:

Morgan Grenfell Investment Trust
P.O. Box 219165
Kansas City, MO 64121

The address for overnight mail, as stated in the prospectus, remains the same.

THE FOLLOWING REVISES THE DESCRIPTION OF THE INVESTMENT ADVISER AND SUBADVISER
IN THE FUNDS' PROSPECTUSES:

The investment adviser to the Funds, Morgan Grenfell Inc., changed its name to
Deutsche Asset Management Inc. effective October 5, 1999. Also effective October
5, 1999, the subadviser to the Total Return Bond Fund, Morgan Grenfell
Investment Services Limited, changed its name to Deutsche Asset Management
Investment Services Limited. All other information disclosed in the prospectus
concerning the investment adviser and subadviser remains the same.

THE FOLLOWING APPLIES TO THE MORGAN GRENFELL HIGH YIELD BOND FUND:

THE FOLLOWING REVISES THE "PRINCIPAL HOLDINGS" SECTION:

The fund may invest up to 10% of its assets in non-U.S. dollar-denominated
foreign securities.

THE FOLLOWING REVISES THE "FOREIGN RISKS" DISCUSSION UNDER "INVESTMENT RISKS":

The fund is subject to the additional risks of foreign investing.


THE FOLLOWING APPLIES TO THE MORGAN GRENFELL SMALLER COMPANIES FUND (THE
"SMALLER COMPANIES FUND"):

On August 19, 1999, the Board of Trustees voted to recommend the reorganization
of the Smaller Companies Fund into the BT Small Cap Fund. The Board has
determined that this proposal is in the best interests of shareholders. The
Smaller Companies Fund and the BT Small Cap Fund currently have the same
investment management teams.

The merger requires the approval of the Smaller Companies Fund's shareholders. A
Special Meeting of Shareholders will be held for this purpose. A proxy statement
describing the proposed reorganization will be sent to shareholders of the
Smaller Companies Fund before the Special Meeting of Shareholders. Management
currently anticipates that the shareholder meeting will take place in the first
quarter of 2000.

If shareholders approve the merger, shares of the Smaller Companies Fund will be
converted to shares of the BT Small Cap Fund. The BT Small Cap Fund has a
master-feeder structure, which differs from the stand-alone structure of the
Smaller Companies Fund. A full description of the BT Small Cap Fund's
master-feeder

<PAGE>

structure will be included in the proxy statement mailed to shareholders. It is
intended that the transfer of shares from the Smaller Companies Fund to the BT
Small Cap Fund will not be a taxable transaction for shareholders.


PLEASE RETAIN THIS SUPPLEMENT FOR FUTURE REFERENCE

MG-F-01-1099-02

<PAGE>

MORGAN GRENFELL INVESTMENT TRUST
Fixed Income Fund, Short-Term Fixed Income Fund, Municipal Bond Fund, Short-Term
Municipal Bond Fund, Total Return Bond Fund, High Yield Bond Fund, Smaller
Companies Fund, Microcap Fund, Large Cap Growth Fund

SUPPLEMENT DATED DECEMBER 17, 1999 (REPLACING SUPPLEMENT DATED NOVEMBER 4, 1999)
TO STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ("SAI") DATED MARCH 1, 1999

THE FOLLOWING REVISES DISCLOSURE OF SECTIONS "CURRENCY MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES"
AND "FORWARD FOREIGN CURRENCY EXCHANGE CONTRACTS":

The Morgan Grenfell High Yield Bond Fund is added to this discussion.

THE FOLLOWING REPLACES DISCLOSURE RELATING TO THE DISTRIBUTOR IN THE FUNDS' SAI
EFFECTIVE NOVEMBER 1, 1999:

THE DISTRIBUTOR
The Trust's distributor is ICC Distributors, Inc., Two Portland Square,
Portland, Maine 04101.

THE FOLLOWING REPLACES DISCLOSURE RELATING TO THE TRANSFER AGENT IN THE FUNDS'
SAI EFFECTIVE NOVEMBER 23, 1999:

THE TRANSFER AGENT
Investment Company Capital Corp., One South Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202
("ICCC"), has been retained to act as transfer and dividend disbursing agent.

THE FOLLOWING REVISES MORGAN GRENFELL INVESTMENT TRUST'S ADDRESS FOR ALL
CORRESPONDENCE, INCLUDING APPLICATIONS:

Morgan Grenfell Investment Trust
P.O. Box 219165
Kansas City, MO 64121

The address for overnight mail, as stated in the SAI, remains the same.

THE FOLLOWING PARAGRAPH IS HEREBY DELETED FROM THE "TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS"
SECTION OF THE FUNDS' SAI:
<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
Principal Occupation During Past Five
Name and Address Positions with Trust Years
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S> <C>
James E. Minnick (1)(3)* President, Chief Executive Officer, President, Secretary and Treasurer,
885 Third Avenue and Trustee Morgan Grenfell Inc. ("MG
New York, NY 10022 Inc.")(since 1990).
(age 50)

Patrick W.W. Disney (1)(3)* Senior Vice President and Trustee Director, Morgan Grenfell Investment
20 Finsbury Circus Services Limited

<PAGE>


London EC2M 1NB ("MGIS") (since 1988).
ENGLAND
(age 42)


THE FOLLOWING PARAGRAPH IS HEREBY ADDED TO THE "TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS" SECTION
OF THE FUNDS' SAI:
Principal Occupation During Past Five
Name and Address Positions with Trust Years
- ----------------------------------------- --------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------
Amy M. Olmert Treasurer, Chief Financial Officer Vice President, Deutsche Asset
One South Street Management Inc. (since 1999); Vice
Baltimore, MD 21202 President, BT Alex. Brown Inc.
(age 36) (1997-1999); Senior Manager,
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP,
(1988-1997)
Daniel O. Hirsch Secretary Principal, Deutsche Asset Management
One South Street Inc.(since July 1998); Assistant
Baltimore, MD 21202 General Counsel, Office of the
(age 45) General Counsel, United States
Securities and Exchange Commission
(1993-1998).

</TABLE>

THE FOLLOWING REVISES THE DESCRIPTION OF THE INVESTMENT ADVISER, ADMINISTRATOR
AND SUBADVISER IN THE FUNDS' SAI:

The investment adviser and administrator to the Funds, Morgan Grenfell Inc.,
changed its name to Deutsche Asset Management Inc. effective October 5, 1999.
Also effective October 5, 1999, the subadviser to the Total Return Bond Fund,
Morgan Grenfell Investment Services Limited, changed its name to Deutsche Asset
Management Investment Services Limited. All other information disclosed in the
SAI concerning the investment adviser, administrator and subadviser remains the
same.

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION SUPPLEMENTS THE "INVESTMENT ADVISORY AND OTHER
SERVICES - PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT" SECTION OF THE SAI FOR THE FIXED INCOME FUND,
SHORT-TERM FIXED INCOME FUND, TOTAL RETURN BOND FUND AND HIGH YIELD BOND FUND
(COLLECTIVELY, THE "FIXED INCOME FUNDS"):
<PAGE>

Robert Guzman has joined the investment team for the Fixed Income Funds as a
portfolio manager. Mr. Guzman has been in the investment advisory business since
1986 and has managed funds with Bankers Trust Company and the Union Bank of
Switzerland.


THE FOLLOWING PARAGRAPH REPLACES IN ITS ENTIRETY THE THIRD PARAGRAPH UNDER
"INVESTMENT ADVISORY AND OTHER SERVICES -- PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT" IN THE SAI FOR
THE SMALLER COMPANIES FUND AND MICROCAP FUND: The Smaller Companies Fund and
Microcap Fund are each managed by a team of three experienced portfolio
managers, Audrey M.T. Jones, John P. Callaghan and Mary P. Dugan. Ms. Jones has
served as a member of the Funds' portfolio management team since the Funds'
inception, and has been employed by the investment adviser as a portfolio
manager since 1986. Mr. Callaghan joined the Funds' portfolio management team
(and the investment adviser) in June 1997 and, prior to such time, worked as a
portfolio manager for Odyssey Partners and Weiss, Peck & Greer. Ms. Dugan joined
the Funds' portfolio management team (and the investment adviser) as a portfolio
manager in June 1999 and, prior to such time, worked as a portfolio manager or
analyst at Bankers Trust Company and Fred Alger Asset Management.

David A. Baratta, formerly a portfolio manager and officer of the Funds (and the
investment adviser), has resigned.

PLEASE RETAIN THIS SUPPLEMENT FOR FUTURE REFERENCE

MG-F-02-1199-04


</TEXT>
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https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/912035/0000950168-99-003168.txt

<DOCUMENT>
<TYPE>EX-99
<SEQUENCE>3
<FILENAME>brkr.txt
<DESCRIPTION>AFFILIATED BROKER DEALER
<TEXT>
Prudential Value Fund
For the fiscal year ended 10/31/02
File number 811-04864


List of Broker/Dealer
(Rider to Screen Number 8 ? Item 14A)


BT Futures Corp.

BT (Far East) Limited

BT Futures (Singapore) Ltd.

Bankers Trust Securities (Pacific) Limited, Cook Islands

BT Notes Limited
Bankers Trust Poland Sp Z. o.o.

BT Capital LLC (Russia)

BT Brokerage Nominees Pte. Ltd.

Deutsche Banc/Alex. Brown Incorporated

Bankers Trust Argentina S.A.

Bankers Trust Securities (Pacific) Limited, Hong Kong

Bankers Trust S.A. Agente Del Mercado Abierto

BT Brokerage & Associates Pte. Ltd.

PT Bina Tatalaksana Pasifik

BT Securities (Europe) Limited

BT Asia Securities Limited

Didier Philippe S.A.

Bankers Trust Corredores De Bolsa Limitada

BT Financial Trading

BT Opera Trading S.A.

Bankers Trust Casa de Bolsa de CV

TISCO Securities Hong Kong Limited

Valores Bankers Trust C.A.

BT France S.A.

BT Alex. Brown Canada Incorporated

BT Alex. Brown Australia Limited

BT Securities Limited

BT Equities (HK) Limited

BT Futures (HK) Ltd.

BTP SA Corretora de Valores Mobilarios

B.T.C. Capital Markets & Investments, Ltd.

BT Distribuidora de Titulos e Valores Ltda.

BT Casa De Cambio, S.A. De C.V.

BT Brokerage (Philippines), Inc.

PT BT Prima Securities Indonesia

Merchant Menkul Degerler AS

BT Brokerage Corporation

Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown Inc.

Deutsche Asia Pacific Holdings PTE Ltd.

Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Holding (Australia) Limited

Deutsche Bank Canada

Deutsche Bank deBary NV

Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Securities Hong Kong

BT Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Asia Indonesia

K & N Kenaga SDN BHD

Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Securities Philippines Inc.

Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Securities (Thailand) Co. Limited

Deutsche Morgan Grenfell - Kenanga SDN BHD

Deutsche Morgan Grenfell Proprietary Ltd.

Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited

National Discount Brokers

BT Funds Management (Singapore) Limited

Bankers Trust Investment Management Limited

BT Citizens Investment Management Co. Ltd.

BT Fund Managers (Ireland) Ltd

Alex. Brown Asset Management Incorporated

Alex. Brown Investments Incorporated

The Morgan Grenfell Small Cap Fund Inc.

Deutsche Asset Management Inc.

Deutsche Asset Management Investment Services Limited

Deutsche Asset Management Group Limited

Deutsche Asset Management Limited

Deutsche Asset Management (International) Limited

Deutsche Asset Management Life and Pensions Limited

Deutsche Unit Trust Managers Limited

Deutsche Investment Funds Limited

Deutsche Asset Management (Property) Limited

Deutsche Investment Trust Managers Limited

Tokai Deutsche Asset Management Limited

Nissay Deutsche Asset Management Europe Limited

McDonald Investments Inc.
Key Global Advisors Ltd.


File numbers may be provided at a later time when available.

T:\Cluster 1\Nsars\PVF\12-02\rider list of broker dealer

</TEXT>
</DOCUMENT>

https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/803191/000035534802000377/brkr.txt

THE ASSASSINATION
OF ALFRED HERRHAUSEN

by Col. L. Fletcher Prouty

On November 30, 1989 Alfred Herrhausen, then Chairman of the Deutsche Bank, West Germany's largest bank, was assassinated on the streets of Frankfurt.

The murder was noted in the newspapers around the world, and then totally dropped. On that day, he had with him a copy of a speech he had been invited to give at the Third Annual Arthur F. Burns Memorial lecture at the American Council on Germany in New York City on December 4th, 1989... within the week of his murder. In this speech he planned to eulogize his old friend Arthur Burns. Arthur Burns, you will recall, had been a long-time Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. He had been Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany. Burns had been born in a part of Eastern Europe that belonged to Austria, at the time, and that is now part of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic. Arthur Burns was a lecturer and advisor at the Graduate School of Banking at the University of Wisconsin when I was attending that Graduate School.

It is absolutely astounding that the subject of the savage murder of this man...Alfred Herrhausen...has been dropped so suddenly from the news. The Deutsche Bank of Germany is undoubtedly one of the most important banks in the world, and its Chairman Herrhausen was one or the most important spokesmen of the banking profession around the world. He would have been a key man in all developments in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

His loss at this time...and the starting nature of his loss are without question... for our day... the equal of the loss of president John F. Kennedy in 1963.

Considering the time... the enormous train of events taking place in the Soviet Union, in Eastern Europe and particularly in East Germany...the murder of Herrhausen is an act of enormous significance. It can not be, and must not be swept under the rug as just "another act of terrorism". True terrorists do not murder Bank presidents without some special reason. Most terrorists are actually the paid pawns, and "mechanics " of great power centers. Some major power center wanted the Chairman of Deutsche bank removed on that day, in that manner for some reason, and as a lesson to others. There has to be a great message in the act of his death.

Do you recall when President Kennedy was murdered? He was on his way to deliver an important speech in Dallas, Texas. On that fateful day, president Kennedy was prepared to say:

"I want to discuss with you today the status of our strength and our security...this nations strength and security are not easily or cheaply obtained nor are they quickly and simply explained. There are many kinds of strength and no one kind will suffice. Overwhelming nuclear strength cannot stop a guerrilla war. Formal pacts of alliance cannot stop internal subversion. Displays of material wealth cannot stop the disillusionment of diplomats subject to discrimination.

But American military might should not and need not stand alone against the ambitions of international communism. Our security and strength, in the last analysis, - directly depend on the security and strength of others, and that is why our military and economic assistance plays such a key role in enabling those who live an the periphery of the Communist world to maintain their independence of choice. "

Those were the words that President Kennedy had planned to say on the day he died. As you read them now you will realize that you can almost apply them with precision to the events of this era. Kennedy was speaking in 1963.., but he was looking ahead.

Only one month earlier President Kennedy had directed the Secretary of Defense to bring 1,000 men home from Vietnam in time for Christmas, and he had promised to have all Americans out of Vietnam before the end of 1965. He, and members of his administration, knew all too well that "nuclear strength cannot stop a guerrilla war," and that outsiders could not do it either. The Vietnamese were going to have to win their own war.

As he had said in an earlier speech:

"There is no single simple policy, which meets this challenge for the independence and equality of all nations. Experience has taught us that no one nation has the power or the wisdom to solve all the problems of the world or manage its revolutionary tides...that extending our commitments does not always increase our security...that any initiative carries with it the risk of temporary defeat... that nuclear weapons cannot prevent subversion...that no free people can be kept free without will and energy of their own... "

I have brought these words from the time of Camelot up today because they are so fresh in our minds. A column in the New York Times of Sunday, February 11, 1990 had this to say:

"The new knowledge of how to release nuclear energy, permanently changed the political life of the world. Indeed, the recent dramatic changes in Eastern Europe arguably followed directly from the stalemate that the fear of nuclear destruction imposed."

Note these two references to the awesome power of Nuclear weapons and the years in which they were made. Kennedy was speaking, 27 years ago, of nuclear weapons and subversive activities. This New York Times column by Richard Rhodes appeared in February, 1990, and spoke of total nuclear destruction. Kennedy was correct. Rhodes cites conventional wisdom and overlooks the real reason for what is happening today in the Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe.

One of the strangest and most unusual meetings ever to have taken place in Washington was convened by the Nixon Administration, February 7-9, 1972. This meeting of more than 1,500 of the nation's top business leaders, was called:

"The White House Conference on the industrial World Ahead: A Look at business in 1990"


In a summary Discussion that followed this, momentous series of meetings, Roy L. Ash, President, Litton Industries, inc. said:

"...State capitalism may well be a form for world business in the world ahead... the western countries are treading toward a more unified and controlled economy, having a greater effect on business; and that the communist nations are moving more and more toward a free market system. The question posed, on which a number of divergent opinions arose, was whether "East and West would meet some place toward the middle about 1990."

In Summary, another speaker, Mr. Frere, said:

"...Communist countries are experimenting with the concept of a market economy... and, the communist countries are forecasting the influx of heavy capital investments by 1990 by the western states."

NOTE: It is interesting to note that Mr. Jean Frere was, in 1972, Managing Partner, Banque Lambert in Brussels, Belgium. It is an affiliate of this enormous financial institution that declared itself in bankruptcy.

See what these men were saying in 1972, about the state of the Industrial World in 1990. They hit it right on the nose. When major businessmen, especially their lawyers and bankers, hit the target on the nose like that you know they are in control.

As I have said earlier, Mr. Banker... Mr. George Champion, formerly President of City Bank and President of the Economic Development council of New York... said:

"When the American citizen is living in debt...
"When American business is operating in debt...and
"When the American government is in debt... Bankers rule the world."


that message appeared in Forbes magazine.

It was no mistake that these business giants hit their target. This development in 1990 was planned that way. Neither Bush, Reagan, Thatcher, Mitterrand, Kohl, or Gorbachev did it. This is the work of the business world... over two strenuous decades.

Let's recall some of the events tied in with this amazing Conference in February, 1972:

a) The Presiding Chairman was the Secretary of Commerce, Maurice Stans. He resigned as Secretary on February 15, 1972 and became the head of Nixon's re-election campaign.

b) The Evening Program was headed by President Richard Nixon. The first U.S. President ever to resign while in office as a result of the Watergate episode that was an outgrowth of the activities of the Committee to Re-elect the President.

c) On the panel, "Structure of the Free Enterprise System: was Alan Greenspan, presently Chairman of the Federal Reserve System.

d) The Luncheon Address, 2nd day, was given by the Secretary of the Treasury, John B. Connally. He resigned the office of Secretary of June 12, 1972. George Schultz became Secretary.

e) Speaking on "The U.S. Position in World Business and the Economy - 1990", Peter G. Peterson from the White house staff and the man who replaced Stans as Secretary of Commerce.

We must keep all of this in perspective. As far back as 1972 the U.S. Government and the top U.S. businessmen had their sights set on the year 1990 and, as Roy Ash said in a summary of the conference:

"East and West would meet someplace toward the middle about 1990."


Remember, that was during a turbulent February, 1972.

THEN: On May 26, 1972, ...only 3 months later... President Nixon and General Secretary Brezhnev agreed to establish a Joint US-USSR Trade and Economic Council, and a companion organization that joined the U.S. Chamber of Commerce with its Soviet counterpart.

With these organizations laying the groundwork, arrangements were made for a twenty-year long preparatory program. With regular meetings in Moscow and New York City every 6 months, plus a permanent staff. One year after 1972 there was not one speech on the subject of the energy crisis. Keep the calendar in mind: In early 1973 the White House convened a conference under the auspices of the National Defense Transportation Association, to war business, especially the transportation sector, that the price of petroleum products would rise precipitously before the end of the year. How did they know that? It was planned that way!

That fall, there was an Arab-Israeli war and an "Arab Oil Embargo" was alleged and the price of petroleum products began to rise four-fold. This action increased oil profits by hundreds of billions of dollars per year. In 1979, the "Three Mile Island" episode was exploited to run these prices even higher. Just as the Alaskan Spill did in 1990.

By this time we can see that big money-making projects run in waves: WWII, the Cold War, including Korea and Vietnam, the Petroleum heist, and banks in the 1980s. Now this opening of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe with their enormous markets for civilian goods will be the next wave. A wave of business...not ideology...not politics...not military.

Few people, and no media, go beyond the cover stories. Just one example: at the close of WWII the U.S.A. had spent $155 billion on the development of the Nuclear Age. This $155 billion asset was given to businesses...courtesy of the taxpayer.

After decades of the "Red Threat", "Communism", "The Evil Empire" and all the other horror stories, we are now coming down for an easy landing that was planned back in 1972.

At the same time, we must keep in mind the warning of Leonard Lewin's great novel "The Report From Iron Mountain." "Can the United States government remain dominant and virile without the threat of war, and can the U.S.A. find a way to live and thrive in an era of peace?". We have been getting some strong voices on this subject:

a) One of the first of these was Walter Wriston, formerly Chairman of Citibank with his prophetic, 1986 book, "Risk and Other Four Letter Words". He says that in a world of global finance, global communications and global transport there is no longer any national sovereignty and that the age of one World is here... like it or not.

As if to verify his early work, I have enclosed copies of speeches made by the Chairmen of two major U.S. corporations, under the heading "Panel Discussion Summary: A Look at Business in 1990."

*L. Fletcher Prouty

http://www.gnosticliberationfront.com/assassination_of_alfred_herrhausen.htm

* Fletcher Prouty
Secretary of Defense, 2 years with the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and 5 years with Headquarters, U.S. Air Force. In 1955 he was appointed the first "Focal Point" officer between the CIA and the Air Force for Clandestine Operations per National Security Council Directive 5412. He was Briefing Officer for the Secretary of Defense (1960-1961), and for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
http://www.prouty.org/

Alfred Herrhausen, (born Jan. 30, 1930, Essen, Ger.—died Nov. 30, 1989, Bad Homburg, W.Ger.), West German captain of industry, chairman of the country’s largest commercial bank (Deutsche Bank).

Herrhausen launched his career as an assistant manager with the utility Ruhrgas in his native city (1952–55). After receiving a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Cologne (1955), he joined the regional utility company in Dortmund, where he distinguished himself by planning its privatization (1966); he was made financial director the following year. He joined Deutsche Bank as a deputy board member (1970) and later became joint chairman (1985) and chairman (1988). Seeking to expand the influence of the bank, he led it into such ventures as management consultation and real estate.

Herrhausen, considered to be a key advisor to West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, served on the boards of such companies as Daimler-Benz AG, Continental Gummi-werke AG, the Xerox Corporation, and various electric utilities. His opinions on easing Third World debt, supporting the economies of emerging eastern European countries, and reunifying Germany reportedly made him a target of terrorists; he and his family lived under heavy security. A small terrorist group known as the Red Army Faction took credit for his assassination, a bombing death which occurred when remote-control explosives wired to a bicycle destroyed Herrhausen’s armoured car as he was being driven to work.
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/263728/Alfred-Herrhausen

The Murder of a CEO
Did East Germany's feared secret police
help kill German businessmen?
By David Crawford
Sept. 15, 2007 11:59 pm ET
PRINT
TEXT
(See Corrections & Amplifications item below.)

Bad Homburg, Germany

The terrorists who killed Alfred Herrhausen were professionals. They dressed as construction workers to lay a wire under the pavement of the road along Mr. Herrhausen's usual route to work. They planted a sack of armor-piercing explosives on a parked bicycle by the roadside. An infrared beam shining across the road triggered the explosion just when the limousine, one of three cars in a convoy, sped by.

The operation, from the terrorists' point of view, was flawless: Mr. Herrhausen, the chairman of one of Europe's most powerful companies, Deutsche Bank, was killed in the explosion along that suburban Frankfurt road on Nov. 30, 1989.

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But was everything what it seemed?

Within days, the Red Army Faction -- a leftist terrorist group that had traumatized West Germany since 1970 with a series of high-profile crimes and brazen killings of bankers and industrialists -- claimed responsibility for the assassination. An intense manhunt followed. In June 1990, police arrested 10 Red Army Faction members who had fled to East Germany to avoid arrest for other crimes. To the police's surprise, they were willing to talk. Equally confounding to authorities: All had solid alibis. None was charged in the Herrhausen attack.

Now, almost two decades later, German police, prosecutors and other security officials have focused on a new suspect: the East German secret police, known as the Stasi. Long fodder for spy novelists like John le Carré, the shadowy Stasi controlled every aspect of East German life through imprisonment, intimidation and the use of informants -- even placing a spy at one point in the office of West German Chancellor Willy Brandt.

According to documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, the murders of Mr. Herrhausen and others attributed to the Red Army Faction bear striking resemblance to methods and tactics pioneered by a special unit of the Stasi. The unit reported to Stasi boss Erich Mielke and actively sought in the waning years of the communist regime to imitate the Red Army Faction to mask their own attacks against prominent people in Western Germany and destabilize the country.

"The investigation has intensified in recent months," said Frank Wallenta, a spokesman for the Federal Prosecutor. "And we are investigating everything, including leads to the Stasi."

If those leads turn out to be true, it would mean not only rewriting some of the most dramatic episodes of the Cold War, but would likely accelerate a broader soul-searching now under way in Germany about the communist past.

In building a reunified country, many Germans have ignored discussion of the brutal realities of its former communist half. When the former East Germany is discussed, it's often with nostalgia or empathy for brothers hostage to Soviet influence.


Stasi boss Erich Mielke, middle, with unnamed associates
That taboo is slowly being broken. Last year's Oscar-winning movie, "The Lives of Others," chronicled in dark detail a Stasi agent's efforts to subvert the lives of ordinary people. Material in the Stasi archives shows that senior leaders had a shoot-to-kill order against those fleeing from East to West -- a controversial order that contradicts East German leaders' claims that they never ordered any shootings.

This story is based on more than a dozen interviews with police, prosecutors and other security officials. Several policemen and prosecutors confirmed that the allegation of extensive Stasi involvement with the Red Army Faction is a key part of the current investigation.

Court cases in West Germany in the 1990s established that members of the Red Army Faction were granted free passage to other countries in the 1970s and refuge in East Germany in the 1980s. But the current investigation and documents from Stasi archives suggest far deeper involvement -- that members of the Red Army Faction were not only harbored by the Stasi but methodically trained in sophisticated techniques of bombing and murder.

Traudl Herrhausen, Mr. Herrhausen's widow, is one of those pushing for further investigation. She says she long suspected involvement by the Stasi or other intelligence service such as the KGB, but never spoke publicly because she didn't have evidence and didn't want to interfere in the investigation. She says she is now breaking an 18-year silence in her desire to see justice done. "Now I want to look my husband's killers in the eye," she said in an interview.

The Red Army Faction was founded about 1970 by a band of leftists who justified their terrorism based on opposition to West Germany's ruling elite. Killing members of this elite would provoke the West German state to take repressive measures that would show its true fascist face, Red Army Faction leaders believed.

In its early years, the group, also known as the Baader-Meinhof band, made headlines with prison breaks, bank robberies, bomb attacks and deadly shootouts. Four gang members led by Ulrike Meinhof freed Red Army Faction leader Andreas Baader from a Berlin jail a month after his arrest.

Red Army Faction violence in West Germany intensified in 1977 when Jürgen Ponto, then head of Dresdner Bank, was shot and killed at his home. Five weeks later, the group killed four people and abducted the chairman of the German employer association, Hans-Martin Schleyer, one of West Germany's most prominent businessmen. It was the start of a six-week ordeal in which neither government nor terrorists would compromise. To support the Red Army Faction cause, Palestinian terrorists hijacked a Lufthansa jet in Spain, forcing it to land in Mogadishu, Somalia. After the plane was rushed by West German commandos, top Red Army Faction leaders in West Germany committed suicide and Mr. Schleyer was executed by his captors.

Red Army Faction violence began to abate in the late 1970s after the Lufthansa incident. Many in Germany thought the group -- whose attacks were often crude -- lost its will to kill after the arrest of its senior leaders in 1982. So when the group appeared to renew its terror campaign with a series of high-profile attacks in 1985, police were stunned by the level of their sophistication and determination.

This time, the group dazzled police with its ability to hit targets and leave little substantial evidence behind. They used high-tech devices no one thought they possessed. Their marksmen killed with military precision.


Weapons used by terrorists during the 1977 kidnapping of German industrialist Hanns-Martin Schleyer.
Surprisingly, members of the Red Army Faction so-called third generation had a policeman's understanding of forensic science. From 1985 onward, the Red Army Faction rarely left a fingerprint or other useful piece of evidence at a crime scene, according to court records. The murder cases from this era are still open. Some suspected Stasi involvement, but no one could ever prove it, according to a senior police official.

The 1989 car-bomb murder of Mr. Herrhausen particularly stunned police with its audacity and sophistication. Mr. Herrhausen was the head of Deutsche Bank, Germany's largest bank. He was part of the political-business elite that helped turn West Germany from a war-ravaged rump state into an economic powerhouse -- all while East Germany languished in frustration. Mr. Herrhausen was a vocal proponent of a united Germany.

In November 1989, Mr. Herrhausen was following the fall of the Berlin wall and events in the Soviet Union closely, conferring frequently with Mikhail Gorbachev, according to his wife and friends. Then on Nov. 27, Mr. Herrhausen announced a plan to acquire the investment banking firm Morgan Grenfell -- at the time a record-breaking bank acquisition.

Also during November, a spot along Mr. Herrhausen's usual route to work was closed because of construction. Terrorists, dressed as construction workers, laid an electric wire under the road's pavement. On Nov. 29, the stretch reopened.

On the morning of Nov. 30, like every workday morning, Mr. Herrhausen stepped into his limousine at about 8:30. Mr. Herrhausen's driver waited about one minute to allow the first of the three-car entourage to drive ahead and survey the road.

"It was the route they hadn't used in weeks," Mrs. Herrhausen said.

As Mr. Herrhausen sped down the road, a team of terrorists waited. Beside the road, a parked bicycle held a sack of armor-piercing explosives. The detonator was connected by the electric wire under the road to a trigger activated by an interruption in an infrared beam shining across the road.

A terrorist activated the detonator after the first car of bodyguards drove past the bomb. Mr. Herrhausen died at the scene.

As they had during previous attacks, police set up dragnets to round up Red Army Faction cadre. But the June 1990 arrests of 10 members of the group who had earlier been granted political asylum in East Germany produced no leads. All the seized Red Army Faction members had solid alibis.


In July 1991, prosecutors believed they had a breakthrough when an informant claimed he had allowed two members of the Red Army Faction to stay at his home near the Herrhausen residence. Prosecutors followed that trail 13 years before dropping charges in 2004.

Frustrated with the inability of prosecutors to solve the Herrhausen case and believing that prosecutors were ignoring other leads including possible Stasi involvement, German officials replaced the prosecutor overseeing the case.

Police acknowledge that part of the reason for their focus on possible Stasi involvement was that all other leads had dried up. But they say they also knew that over the years the Stasi had worked with and given explosives to other terrorists, including "Carlos the Jackal" and the Basque group ETA in Spain. And in 2001 to 2003, an undercover police officer met with a man who claimed he had been a killer for the Stasi operating in Western Germany, although police were never able to tie him to specific murders.

German investigators turned their attention to Wartin, a small eastern German village nestled in yellow-brown fields of grain near the Polish border. Today, sheep graze in a field spotted with wooden posts.

But was everything what it seemed?

Within days, the Red Army Faction -- a leftist terrorist group that had traumatized West Germany since 1970 with a series of high-profile crimes and brazen killings of bankers and industrialists -- claimed responsibility for the assassination. An intense manhunt followed. In June 1990, police arrested 10 Red Army Faction members who had fled to East Germany to avoid arrest for other crimes. To the police's surprise, they were willing to talk. Equally confounding to authorities: All had solid alibis. None was charged in the Herrhausen attack.

Now, almost two decades later, German police, prosecutors and other security officials have focused on a new suspect: the East German secret police, known as the Stasi. Long fodder for spy novelists like John le Carré, the shadowy Stasi controlled every aspect of East German life through imprisonment, intimidation and the use of informants -- even placing a spy at one point in the office of West German Chancellor Willy Brandt.

According to documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, the murders of Mr. Herrhausen and others attributed to the Red Army Faction bear striking resemblance to methods and tactics pioneered by a special unit of the Stasi. The unit reported to Stasi boss Erich Mielke and actively sought in the waning years of the communist regime to imitate the Red Army Faction to mask their own attacks against prominent people in Western Germany and destabilize the country.

"The investigation has intensified in recent months," said Frank Wallenta, a spokesman for the Federal Prosecutor. "And we are investigating everything, including leads to the Stasi."

If those leads turn out to be true, it would mean not only rewriting some of the most dramatic episodes of the Cold War, but would likely accelerate a broader soul-searching now under way in Germany about the communist past.

In building a reunified country, many Germans have ignored discussion of the brutal realities of its former communist half. When the former East Germany is discussed, it's often with nostalgia or empathy for brothers hostage to Soviet influence.


Stasi boss Erich Mielke, middle, with unnamed associates
That taboo is slowly being broken. Last year's Oscar-winning movie, "The Lives of Others," chronicled in dark detail a Stasi agent's efforts to subvert the lives of ordinary people. Material in the Stasi archives shows that senior leaders had a shoot-to-kill order against those fleeing from East to West -- a controversial order that contradicts East German leaders' claims that they never ordered any shootings.

This story is based on more than a dozen interviews with police, prosecutors and other security officials. Several policemen and prosecutors confirmed that the allegation of extensive Stasi involvement with the Red Army Faction is a key part of the current investigation.

Court cases in West Germany in the 1990s established that members of the Red Army Faction were granted free passage to other countries in the 1970s and refuge in East Germany in the 1980s. But the current investigation and documents from Stasi archives suggest far deeper involvement -- that members of the Red Army Faction were not only harbored by the Stasi but methodically trained in sophisticated techniques of bombing and murder.

Traudl Herrhausen, Mr. Herrhausen's widow, is one of those pushing for further investigation. She says she long suspected involvement by the Stasi or other intelligence service such as the KGB, but never spoke publicly because she didn't have evidence and didn't want to interfere in the investigation. She says she is now breaking an 18-year silence in her desire to see justice done. "Now I want to look my husband's killers in the eye," she said in an interview.

The Red Army Faction was founded about 1970 by a band of leftists who justified their terrorism based on opposition to West Germany's ruling elite. Killing members of this elite would provoke the West German state to take repressive measures that would show its true fascist face, Red Army Faction leaders believed.

In its early years, the group, also known as the Baader-Meinhof band, made headlines with prison breaks, bank robberies, bomb attacks and deadly shootouts. Four gang members led by Ulrike Meinhof freed Red Army Faction leader Andreas Baader from a Berlin jail a month after his arrest.

Red Army Faction violence in West Germany intensified in 1977 when Jürgen Ponto, then head of Dresdner Bank, was shot and killed at his home. Five weeks later, the group killed four people and abducted the chairman of the German employer association, Hans-Martin Schleyer, one of West Germany's most prominent businessmen. It was the start of a six-week ordeal in which neither government nor terrorists would compromise. To support the Red Army Faction cause, Palestinian terrorists hijacked a Lufthansa jet in Spain, forcing it to land in Mogadishu, Somalia. After the plane was rushed by West German commandos, top Red Army Faction leaders in West Germany committed suicide and Mr. Schleyer was executed by his captors.

Red Army Faction violence began to abate in the late 1970s after the Lufthansa incident. Many in Germany thought the group -- whose attacks were often crude -- lost its will to kill after the arrest of its senior leaders in 1982. So when the group appeared to renew its terror campaign with a series of high-profile attacks in 1985, police were stunned by the level of their sophistication and determination.

This time, the group dazzled police with its ability to hit targets and leave little substantial evidence behind. They used high-tech devices no one thought they possessed. Their marksmen killed with military precision.


Weapons used by terrorists during the 1977 kidnapping of German industrialist Hanns-Martin Schleyer.
Surprisingly, members of the Red Army Faction so-called third generation had a policeman's understanding of forensic science. From 1985 onward, the Red Army Faction rarely left a fingerprint or other useful piece of evidence at a crime scene, according to court records. The murder cases from this era are still open. Some suspected Stasi involvement, but no one could ever prove it, according to a senior police official.

The 1989 car-bomb murder of Mr. Herrhausen particularly stunned police with its audacity and sophistication. Mr. Herrhausen was the head of Deutsche Bank, Germany's largest bank. He was part of the political-business elite that helped turn West Germany from a war-ravaged rump state into an economic powerhouse -- all while East Germany languished in frustration. Mr. Herrhausen was a vocal proponent of a united Germany.

In November 1989, Mr. Herrhausen was following the fall of the Berlin wall and events in the Soviet Union closely, conferring frequently with Mikhail Gorbachev, according to his wife and friends. Then on Nov. 27, Mr. Herrhausen announced a plan to acquire the investment banking firm Morgan Grenfell -- at the time a record-breaking bank acquisition.

Also during November, a spot along Mr. Herrhausen's usual route to work was closed because of construction. Terrorists, dressed as construction workers, laid an electric wire under the road's pavement. On Nov. 29, the stretch reopened.

On the morning of Nov. 30, like every workday morning, Mr. Herrhausen stepped into his limousine at about 8:30. Mr. Herrhausen's driver waited about one minute to allow the first of the three-car entourage to drive ahead and survey the road.

"It was the route they hadn't used in weeks," Mrs. Herrhausen said.

As Mr. Herrhausen sped down the road, a team of terrorists waited. Beside the road, a parked bicycle held a sack of armor-piercing explosives. The detonator was connected by the electric wire under the road to a trigger activated by an interruption in an infrared beam shining across the road.

A terrorist activated the detonator after the first car of bodyguards drove past the bomb. Mr. Herrhausen died at the scene.

As they had during previous attacks, police set up dragnets to round up Red Army Faction cadre. But the June 1990 arrests of 10 members of the group who had earlier been granted political asylum in East Germany produced no leads. All the seized Red Army Faction members had solid alibis.


In July 1991, prosecutors believed they had a breakthrough when an informant claimed he had allowed two members of the Red Army Faction to stay at his home near the Herrhausen residence. Prosecutors followed that trail 13 years before dropping charges in 2004.

Frustrated with the inability of prosecutors to solve the Herrhausen case and believing that prosecutors were ignoring other leads including possible Stasi involvement, German officials replaced the prosecutor overseeing the case.

Police acknowledge that part of the reason for their focus on possible Stasi involvement was that all other leads had dried up. But they say they also knew that over the years the Stasi had worked with and given explosives to other terrorists, including "Carlos the Jackal" and the Basque group ETA in Spain. And in 2001 to 2003, an undercover police officer met with a man who claimed he had been a killer for the Stasi operating in Western Germany, although police were never able to tie him to specific murders.

German investigators turned their attention to Wartin, a small eastern German village nestled in yellow-brown fields of grain near the Polish border. Today, sheep graze in a field spotted with wooden posts.

In the 1980s, however, Wartin was home to the Stasi's AGM/S -- "Minister Working Group/Special Operations." It got its name because it reported to Mr. Mielke, the minister who headed the Stasi for almost all of East Germany's 40-year history.

The Wartin unit's peacetime duties included the kidnapping and murder of influential people in the West, according to Stasi records reviewed by The Wall Street Journal in the Stasi archives in Berlin.

The documents say the unit's activities included "intimidating anti-communist opinion leaders" by "liquidation," and "kidnapping or hostage taking, connected with the demand that political messages be read," according to a description of the unit's activities written by a senior Wartin official in 1982.

Based on these documents, German investigators increasingly believe that the Stasi played a more active role than previously believed in Red Army Faction terrorism. After years of not being able to draw parallels between the Stasi unit in Wartin and the Red Army Faction killings, police are now focusing closely on such a link. Joachim Lampe, who assisted the successful prosecution of the first wave of Red Army Faction terrorists up until 1982 and was then assigned to prosecute Stasi-related crimes in West Germany, says it's time to compare the activities of Wartin with the activities of the Red Army Faction to see where they overlap. "It is an important line of investigation," he said.


A year after the Red Army Faction's first generation collapsed in 1972, an internal Wartin report said cooperation with terrorists is possible if the individuals could be trusted to maintain secrecy and obey orders. Initial contacts, however, may not have taken place until later in the decade. Disillusionment gripped many of the terrorists living on the lam, according to court records citing witness statements by accused terrorists. Beginning about 1980, the Stasi granted refuge to 10 members of the Red Army Faction in East Germany and gave them assumed identities.

The Stasi sympathized with the anti-capitalist ideals of the Red Army Faction, but Stasi leaders were concerned about placing their trust in a group of uncontrollable leftist militants, a review of Stasi records shows. Stasi officials did not want to tarnish East Germany's international reputation, so they toyed with different concepts for cooperation with terrorist groups, according to a prosecutor who has investigated Stasi involvement with terrorism.

One suggestion, contained in a document prepared for new officers assigned to the unit, was to emulate Romanian intelligence, which successfully worked with the terrorist "Carlos" to bomb the Radio Free Europe office in Munich, Germany, in 1981. To assist in such operations, the Wartin unit developed highly specialized explosives, poisons and miniature firearms.

About 1980 the Stasi also proposed a second strategy: instead of using a terrorist group directly -- such cooperation always contained risk of discovery -- they could simply execute attacks so similar to those of known terrorists that police would never look for a second set of suspects, according to Wartin records. The Wartin leadership called this strategy the "perpetrator principle," according to Stasi records. The unit's progress in implementing the steps to imitate terrorist attacks is described in a series of progress reports by Wartin officials between 1980 and 1987.

In September 1981, Red Army Faction terrorists attempted to kill U.S. Gen. James Kroesen in Heidelberg, Germany, shooting a bazooka at his car. About the same time, members of the same Red Army Faction team visited East Germany, where they were asked by the Stasi to shoot a bazooka at a car containing a dog. The dog died, according to court records.

In Wartin, officials wrote up a detailed description of the Red Army Faction members' re-enactment of the Kroesen attack. "It is important to collect all accessible information about the terrorist scene in imperialist countries, to study and analyze their equipment, methods and tactics, so we can do it ourselves," a senior Wartin official wrote in February 1982, according to the report.

In 1982, West German police discovered two troves of Red Army Faction weapons and documents buried in German forests. Three terrorists, including Red Army Faction leader Christian Klar, were arrested when they approached the sites. The troves were buried in locations easy to find at night, a tactic used by Wartin's own agents to store operational equipment in West Germany, according to an investigator who viewed the troves and Stasi records.

That same year, a Wartin official described the staged bombing of a moving vehicle. According to the report, several Stasi officers shed "tears of joy" when electronic sensors detected the approaching car and ignited the detonator.

A spokesman at Germany's federal police investigative agency, the equivalent of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, declined to comment on the close similarity between the detonator used in the demonstration and the device that killed Mr. Herrhausen, saying this is part of their investigation.

Wartin officers continued their preparations for imitating terrorist attacks in West Germany, according to a 1985 internal Wartin report. They created a special archive profiling the characteristics of known terrorists and terrorist groups, and taught staff members to execute nearly identical attacks, according to Stasi records. Each year, the unit's officers detailed the unit's success in teaching these techniques in their annual reports, according to the reports.

Then, in 1987, the AGM/S stopped offensive operations. The unit was disbanded.

Werner Grossmann, a former three-star Stasi General and former head of foreign intelligence operations, says the AGM/S was responsible for planning attacks in West Germany, but was dissolved "because it didn't produce results." Mr. Grossmann assumed control of part of the AGM/S after most of the unit was dissolved.

Mr. Grossmann says he took control of part of the AGM/S because he wanted to run intelligence operations against West Germany's civil defense infrastructure.

"I refused to have anything to do with terrorism and terrorists," Mr. Grossmann said in an interview. He said he didn't have any influence over the AGM/S activities before 1987 and wasn't informed about the unit's activities before it came under his control.

Olaf Barnickel, a career Stasi officer who served at Wartin, says his unit planned murders in West Germany, but never committed one. "It was all theory and no practice," Mr. Barnickel said in an interview.

But some German police are unpersuaded. They believe the seeds may have been planted for future violent attacks.

In November 1989, as East Germany disintegrated, groups of citizens forced their way into Stasi installations, seizing control. In Wartin, a local church minister led a group of demonstrators to the main entrance of the Stasi base. The base closed.

Within the Stasi as a whole, the chain of command began to disintegrate. Links to organizations in West Germany, including the Red Army Faction, were broken.

Sixteen months after Mr. Herrhausen's murder, the Red Army Faction claimed its last victim, killing Detlev Karsten Rohwedder, the head of the Treuhandanstalt, the powerful trust that controlled most state-owned assets in the former East Germany and was overseeing their privatization. Mr. Rohwedder was killed while he was standing by the window of his house in Düsseldorf.

The murder was performed by a trained sharpshooter, according to a police official familiar with the investigation. The Stasi trained members of the Red Army Faction in sharpshooting skills and had its own teams of sharpshooters, according to witness statements by Stasi officials to a Berlin prosecutor and Stasi records.

In 1998, the Red Army Faction issued the last of its communiques, announcing it was disbanding. German police attribute the group's disappearance to changing times, which made the group seem a relic of the past. Indeed, the Red Army Faction today is largely seen by the German public as part of the social upheaval that plagued West Germany in the 1970s and 1980s. More than one in four Germans consider former Red Army Faction members to have been misguided idealists. More than half now think the investigations should be closed for good in the coming decade when the current group of Red Army Faction prisoners finish serving their prison sentences.

German prosecutors say their investigation of the Stasi's role is continuing.

Since last month, Mrs. Herrhausen has been in contact with the next of kin of victims in the other unsolved Red Army Faction murder cases, looking for support to push the investigation. The bomb that killed her husband nearly 18 years ago exploded soon after he left for work, within earshot of their home in suburban Frankfurt.

"I still hear that bomb every day," she says.

—Almut Schoenfeld in Berlin contributed to this article.

Corrections & Amplifications:

Frederick James Kroesen is a now-retired U.S. army general whose car was attacked by the Red Army Faction in 1981. This article incorrectly gave his name as James Kroesen.

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Morgan, Grenfell & Co. was a leading London-based investment bank regarded as one of the oldest and once most influential British merchant banks. Wikipedia
Founder: George Peabody
Founded: 1838
Successor: Deutsche Bank
Headquarters: London, United Kingdom

November 27, 2014
25 years ago: Deutsche Bank announces Morgan Grenfell acquisition
In November 1989, Deutsche Bank announced its intentions to make a formal offer for UK merchant bank Morgan Grenfell.

The subsequent GBP 950 million acquisition gave Deutsche Bank 2,300 new employees across 30 offices and a partnership with an influential institution with shared values. The transaction closed in 1990, but the relationship between the two banks dates back to at least 1874 when they both discussed extending a GBP 2 million loan to the city of Vienna.

The paths of the two companies would again cross in 1983 when Deutsche Bank sought the advice of Morgan Grenfell as it looked to enhance its geographic and product offering. The exploration was driven by Alfred Herrhausen, Spokesman of the Management Board of Deutsche Bank who, together with Hilmar Kopper, Management Board Member responsible for corporate finance and capital markets at the time, was keen to explore investing in a London-based merchant bank.

Deutsche Bank’s response to Morgan Grenfell’s subsequent report was to initiate talks about a joint venture and, in April 1984, the Bank proposed buying a stake in Morgan Grenfell and establishing a best friends relationship. On November 7, 1984, Deutsche Bank bought 4.9% of Morgan Grenfell’s parent company for GBP 14 million, a move that was central to Deutsche Bank’s expansion beyond its home base.

Following the 1987 stock market crash, Morgan Grenfell largely withdrew from securities trading to refocus on its traditional strengths of corporate finance and asset management. With the only area of significant overlap with Deutsche Bank removed, the banks became what Herrhausen would soon call “an excellent fit”.

In October 1989, Deutsche Bank and Morgan Grenfell entered detailed takeover discussions. On November 27 that year, the deal was officially announced at press conferences held simultaneously in London and Frankfurt before the start of trading. When Alfred Herrhausen and John Craven, CEO of Morgan Grenfell, told Morgan Grenfell staff, they received a standing ovation.

A formal offer on December 7, 1989, saw Deutsche Bank acquire Morgan Grenfell for 550 pence per share. The transaction was largely seen as the beginning of Deutsche Bank’s ambitions to become a leading global universal bank. The December 2, 1989 edition of The Economist described Herrhausen, who was assassinated on November 30, as “the mastermind of Deutsche Bank’s diversification”.


Additional Information:
Deutsche Bank History
Historical Association of Deutsche Bank

https://www.db.com/unitedkingdom/content/en/2964.html