Aditya Tomar

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Wife of banker killed in train crash was told he was 'fine' and could be picked up in the morning after heartbreaking hospital mixup

JP Morgan employee Aditya Tomar, 41, was one of six victim who died in the Tuesday crash in Valhalla, New York
When wife rushed to hospital to see if he survived the accident, she claims she was told he was 'fine' and just undergoing X-rays
She learned the next day that Tomar had in fact perished
NTSB investigators were working on Thursday to examine the tracks, interview the train's crew and find out whether stalled Mercedes SUV that caused collision had a data recorder of its own
Service on the Harlem Line resumed on Thursday with delays, as trains slowed down through the crash site area in Valhalla, New York

By Ashley Collman For Dailymail.com and Louise Boyle For Daily Mail Online and Associated Press

Published: 19:18 EDT, 5 February 2015 | Updated: 05:18 EDT, 6 February 2015
Aditya Tomar (pictured), who was born in India and worked for JP Morgan, was identified as a victim of the Metro North collision. His family have now spoken out, saying they were told by hospital workers that he survived the crash

When the family of Aditya Tomar learned that his regular commuter train from New York City had been involved in a fiery train crash on Tuesday, they rushed to the hospital hoping and praying that he was one of the survivors.

Unfortunately, the 41-year-old JP Morgan employee was one of the six commuters who perished in the crash, though hospital workers reportedly told the family that he was fine and to come back in the morning to collect him.

It wasn't until Wednesday night that they learned the awful truth, causing even more heartbreak for Tomar's widow, Reshma Persaud, and his family.

Tomar's mother-in-law Dee Persaud spoke with the New York Daily News outside her daughter's home in Danbury,Connecticut on Thursday, revealing that Tomar had been texting back and forth with both his wife and brother-in-law Renaldo just minutes before the crash.

'At 5:45pm he told her, "I'm on the train and I'll be home soon,'"' she said.

But then - around 6:20pm - communication went quiet and his wife started to worry when he didn't get home by his usual time of 7pm. Reshma texted her husband asking 'Where are you?' but got no answer.

'She thought maybe he had to stay at work late. But at 11 o'clock he still wasn't home and she started to get worried,' Dee said.

It was around that time that Reshma started calling the train stations and hospitals and learned that a major accident had happened in Valhalla, involving a Mercedes-Bez SUV that was stalled on the tracks and was struck by a Metro-North train, sparking a 'mass-casualty' incident.

Reshma and her brother rushed to Westchester County Medical Center to see if Tomar was among the injured, where they received some good - but ultimately false - news.

'Somebody there, the security, said, "He's fine, he's undergoing X-rays,"' Dee said.

That person also told Reshma to go home and come back in the morning, but her brother remained suspicious that all was well.

'Something didn't add up in my son's mind, so he dropped his sister home and went back on his own,' Dee said. 'He was there all night trying to figure out if (Tomar) was actually in the hospital.'

The next morning, they realized that everyone at the hospital had been accounted for except Tomar, and Reshma submitted her husband's medical records to the Medical Examiner. Later that night they finally got confirmation that he was among the deceased.

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Tomar had been texting back and forth with his wife and brother-in-law in the minutes leading up to the crash Tuesday night
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Tomar had been texting back and forth with his wife and brother-in-law in the minutes leading up to the crash Tuesday night
National Transportation Security Board officials finished their first full day of investigation on Thursday, and have so far found that all signals, horns and bells were working at the time of the accident
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National Transportation Security Board officials finished their first full day of investigation on Thursday, and have so far found that all signals, horns and bells were working at the time of the accident
A National Transportation Safety Board employee (left) takes pictures of a section of railroad track where an SUV was struck by a Metro-North Railroad train
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A group of employees gather evidence at the scene of the Metro-North crash in Westchester County
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A National Transportation Safety Board employee (left) takes pictures of a section of railroad track where an SUV was struck by a Metro-North Railroad train. Right, a group of employees gather evidence at the scene

'They confirmed that it was him,' Dee Persaud said. 'Up to last night, even though everything seemed to be saying he is one of the victims, we were all praying that they were gonna say, "You know what, it's not him. He is somewhere hurt and we just couldn't find him."'

A spokesman for Westchester Medical Center told the Daily News that they are looking into the incident.

According to Dee Persaud, Tomar moved to the U.S. from India by himself in the 1990s to study at the renowned Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In addition to his academic success, he also could play several instruments and was quite competitive in cricket.

The loss of Tomar comes as a huge blow to his widow Reshma, who does not have a job.

'He was the sole bread-winner and he did everything for the family, so right now it's just shock," she said.
Married mother-of-three Ellen Brody was identified as the driver of an SUV which was hit by a train on Tuesday in Valhalla, New York when she stopped her vehicle on the tracks. She and five others died in the horrific collision
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Married mother-of-three Ellen Brody was identified as the driver of an SUV which was hit by a train on Tuesday in Valhalla, New York when she stopped her vehicle on the tracks. She and five others died in the horrific collision

Tomar's funeral is scheduled for Friday, and his mother-in-law is hoping to get at least one of his brothers to travel from India to take back the ashes to their home land.

The National Transportation Security Board finished their first full day investigating the crash on Thursday, and held a press conference at 5pm to reveal some of their findings.

NTSB Vice Chairman Robert Sumwalt confirmed that a car accident had occurred a nearby road, diverting traffic onto Commerce Street where the crash happened.

Reports so far show that 49-year-old Ellen Brody crossed onto the tracks, when the crossing gate slammed down on the back of her vehicle. Instead of pulling through the intersection though, she got out to inspect the back of her car. It was when she got back in her car and started to pull forward that she was struck by the passing train - going 58mph.

Both Brody and five train passengers were killed in the accident, in addition to more than a dozen injured.

Sumwalt revealed Thursday that they had interviewed the driver who was directly behind Brody at the intersection, who said he didn't recall hearing the train's horn or the crossing bells, which signal an approaching train.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2941793/Hospital-mix-means-wife-train-crash-victim-told-fine-picked-morning-actually-died-fiery-blaze.html#ixzz4ms8MJmmU

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2941793/Hospital-mix-means-wife-train-crash-victim-told-fine-picked-morning-actually-died-fiery-blaze.html

 

 

Aditya Tomar: Lives remembered
Matt Coyne Published 7:04 p.m. ET Feb. 5, 2015 | Updated 7:24 a.m. ET Feb. 6, 2015
As we gather to mourn and bury the six local victims of this week's horrific train crash, we commemorate their lives and remember all that they meant to their communities.

Even as he was building an impressive career in the cutthroat world of finance, Aditya Tomar was a generous person who always took the time to give back.

Tomar's colleague and friend Santhosh Kumar considered Tomar a mentor, and described him in superlatives: smart, talented, dedicated, hardworking and generous with his time.

"He's one of the people, if they called me at three in the morning, I'd do anything for him," said Kumar. "That's the kind of thing he'd do for me."

Tomar, an immigrant from India, studied at the Indian Institute of Technology and Miami University in Ohio before beginning his career at Con Edison, where he worked in commodity pricing. He'd move on to work at a litany of the world's top financial firms: Barclays Capital, Stanford C. Bernstein and Morgan Stanley.

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Outside work, Kumar said Tomar was proud of his Indian heritage and loved his wife, Reshma, and his house, a white colonial that sits on a hill near Danbury High School in Connecticut.

"He loved his wife more than anything else," Kumar said.

Kumar, an Indian immigrant himself, met Tomar at Barclays. Tomar took Kumar, then an analyst, under his wing, and, Kumar said, helped him ease into finance and inspired him to stay in the industry.

"There were so many things that were alien to me," Kumar said. "He'd come into work to help me."

And he'd come early. During their time together at Barclays in 2010 and 2011, Kumar said Tomar would leave his Danbury, Conn. home before 5 a.m., commuting by rail into the city.

Kumar moved on from Barclays to work at AIG, but even after parting ways, the two would keep in touch. They would talk about seeing each other for Diwali, a Hindu festival each fall.

And in the four years since the two worked together, Kumar still remembers the effort Tomar put into teaching him the ropes and credits him in part for helping him to his success now.

"I've been successful in my own job," Kumar said. "He helped me achieve this in a way."

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/local/2015/02/05/aditya-tomar-lives-remembered/22947061/